Do they make a tool to clean up threads on a garden hose?

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Both ends of my garden hoses are kind of beaten up but the brass is still thick and strong.
Do they make a relatively inexpensive (as compared to the hose) tool to clean up those threads?
The problem is this is a one-time use only and I asked at Orchard Supply who said they don't make such a "thread chaser" for garden hose threads.
They had "thread files" for regular SAE threads, but not garden hoses.
They have taps and dies for pipes, but it would be cheaper ($50 per hose) to buy another good-quality 3/4" all-rubber hose than to buy an expensive tap & die even if it were made (which OSH says is not).
What would YOu use to clean up an old, but, still strong, solid brass garden hose threads?
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Brent wrote:

a brass hose nozzle
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chaniarts wrote:

Seems to me a regular set of black or galvanized fittings would help more given they're harder than the brass...
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dpb wrote:

Ignore...hose threads aren't NPT... <...slaps self...>
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Brent wrote:

A small triangular file, about 1/8" on a side.
Jeff
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Hardware stores all carry replacement ends .. price varies with quality, but they all work. Just be sure to get the correct size for your hose.
On 8/4/2010 1:11 PM, Brent wrote:

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Most are a POS, and not much better than the boogered one on there. I personally like the plastic ones than the thin metal ones, and I have yet to see good heavy brass repair ends.
Steve
visit my blog at http://cabgbypasssurgery.com
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re: "I have yet to see good heavy brass repair ends"
These choices all *look* good, but who knows.
http://www.farmtek.com/farm/supplies/prod1 ;ft1_lawn_garden-ft1_lawn_garden_hoses-ft1_garden_hose_fittings_couplers;pg103384.html
http://www.gilmour.com/Watering/Hose-End/Hose-Repair/Zinc-Menders/Brass-Couplers.aspx
http://www.horseloverz.com/Female-coupling-hose-Repair---Brass---58-Inch-pr-310619.html
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On Wed, 4 Aug 2010 13:23:16 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03
message

I've tried those. If your hose-walls are exactly the right thickness they work good for a while & are easy to tighten or reuse.

They *are* the ones-- better than factory on a wide range of hoses.

Those also rely on the thickness of the hose wall. I haven't had good luck with them.
Jim
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DKAY, but I have trouble finding the right fixit for the right wall thickness. Most of the hoses I buy are either cheapies with the thin metal ends, or the really good thick ones with the hefty brass. The hefty ones last, and I really haven't had to fix any. The wimpy thin ones are another story. After they get pressurized a few times, they have to be redid.
Steve
visit my blog at http://cabgbypasssurgery.com
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Odd. I have been using them for over 30 years and have nevery had to "fix" any of them unless I boogered it up by cross threading. Never had to tighten one either that was correctly applied originally.
Harry K
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I use the plastic ones all the time and have no problem with them. Granted one of those on the end of a quality hose does look odd but...
Harry K
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Brent wrote:

Would depend largely on just how badly they're beat up; don't know why would be such, particularly the spigot connection (female) end.
Any thin file or hone would let you touch up external threads; interior would take some finagling, depending again on what/where the damage is.
I'd look for solid taps/dies on places like eBay or CL; one can find old Craftsman or other brand stuff on occasion that comes from estates or other similar sources for not too much sometimes. I've not looked; it might even be possible to find some really cheap HF or similar import stuff that would be adequate for the purpose.
Alternatively, use some regular steel fittings to see if they'll chase the brass; it being somewhat softer. Some coarse grit compound could help maybe.
I've got a full-range set of pipe dies up to 2" in an inherited set of Craftsman from grandfather that date back to 30's and taps to 1" similar age. Found a Ridgid adjustable on eBay reasonable a couple years ago for 1" - 2-1/2" so haven't worried about looking recently.
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dpb wrote: ...

Ignore...hose thread isn't NPT. <...slaps self...>
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On Wed, 04 Aug 2010 12:38:52 -0500, dpb wrote:

Exactly. They don't seem to MAKE a hose-thread tap and die ... and even if they did, it would cost more than the hose (which is about $50 for a decent hose).
But maybe a thread chaser would work if I can find one in the right hose thread and pitch (whatever that is for a garden hose).
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On Aug 4, 11:11am, Brent <beemdoub...@Use-Author-Supplied- Address.invalid> wrote:

== I just use a battery post cleaner...you know, the pointy end for the battery clamps. If that is too harsh a fine emery cloth in folds can follow the threads. In all cases don't use too much pressure to prevent deep scratches especially with the battery brush. ==
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On Wed, 4 Aug 2010 10:28:08 -0700 (PDT), Roy wrote:

Interesting idea. I didn't mention it, but, a lot of the "crud" on the hose is just caked on deposits ... so maybe the battery post cleaner will work.
However, some is dinged up brass, in which case I'll need to reshape the threads with some kind of thread chaser.
Although I did look at the suggested replacement ends which is a different approach ... i.e., instead of fixing them, just replace them.
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Soaking overnight in common vinegar, then a toothbrush sized wire brush works for removing that scale from stuff I clean.
Steve
visit my blog at http://cabgbypasssurgery.com
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On Wed, 4 Aug 2010 17:00:09 -0700, Steve B wrote:

I understand that. It just might be lime 'crudding' up the threads that are scaled (the dinged threads are another matter).
Thanks for that hint.
It seems a "thread chaser" specifically for garden hoses does not exist. :(
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Shhhhhhhh! Get it together, and then submit it to the OMB for consideration by "The Green Machine". Don't forget to set aside my 15%. And put that it will save one million gallons of water a minute that's currently being wasted. Don't know if that's accurate, but it sure sounds good, don't it?
We need to save the wasted water, by golly! It's an endless loop, but it must be saved.
Steve
visit my blog at http://cabgbypasssurgery.com
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