Do they make a rubbery paint for chipped refrigerator wire racks?

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We're giving our old BBQ fridge away to a neighbor's kid who is heading off to college.
The racks were slightly rusted from being outside for years, so I dunked them in muriatic and phosphoric acid (in that order) and rinsed them well:
http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7379/9568891966_2d99e79f78_o.gif
Now the rust is gone, but, there is bare metal where the rust was.
http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7442/9566098377_36b55b169d_o.gif
What would you paint these with?
http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7434/9568891862_47ba7ecdff_o.gif
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On Thu, 22 Aug 2013 06:50:20 +0000 (UTC), "Danny D."
they make a rubbery paint for chipped refrigerator wire racks?:

I would use this <http://www.plastidip.com/home_solutions/Plasti_Dip
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CRNG wrote:

Now that I know the name, I'll look for it at either Ace or Home Depot today. http://homedepot.com/p/Performix-Brand-11-oz-White-Plasti-Dip-Spray-6-Pack-11207-6/203545034
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replying to Danny D. , beverly wrote:

today.

http://homedepot.com/p/Performix-Brand-11-oz-White-Plasti-Dip-Spray-6-Pack-11207-6/203545034
hi, i have a refrigerator with rusted chrome plated racks. does anyone know if there is paint for that?
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No paint will adhere to chrome.
Nice thing about the internet, you can find replacement parts for almost everything. Get some nice new replacement racks.
--
Dan Espen

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wrote:

I dont agree. I had a car some years ago, and someome before I bought the car, spray painted the chrome bumpers black. (Dont ask me why, cuz I dont know). I tried to scrape it off, and that did not work. I considered using paint remover but feared I'd damage the car's finish.
I decided to paint the bumpers with some chrome like spray paint which is a highly shiny silver. That worked fine. I dont know how long it lasted because I sold the car a few months later.
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snipped-for-privacy@none.com writes:

Seemed to me like chrome would offer nothing for the paint to grab on to. I'd still go with finding replacement shelves and replacing.
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Dan Espen

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On 10/27/2015 9:37 AM, snipped-for-privacy@none.com wrote:

Former owner was probably a Black Bumper Mennonite. If the car had whitewalls the tires would have been turned around. They were allowed to use the automobile, but it had to be plain, this the chrome covered.
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On Mon, 26 Oct 2015 18:44:02 +0000, beverly

I"m hearing that aluminum foil is great for removing rust. Use the shiny side one guy said. If they look good after you finish, spray with some clear coating. Let dry extra well before you put in t he cold refrigerator
And of course rust won't hurt anything. You're concerned about aesthetics, right?
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On 8/22/2013 1:50 AM, Danny D. wrote:

It has actually been on the market for some time by at least one manufacturer. ^_^
http://www.plastidip.com/home_solutions/ReRACK
(Amazon.com product link shortened)
http://www.acehardware.com/product/index.jsp?productId (90818
TDD
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The Daring Dufas wrote:

That's a great idea! Performix® Rerack® Dishwasher Rack Repair (630076)
A dishwasher would get wet all the time, just like my BBQ frig did, so, it makes sense a dishwasher product would work.
I'll head on down to ACE today.
Thanks!
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On Thu, 22 Aug 2013 06:51:43 -0700, Bob F wrote:

Thanks for the pointer to the reviews. It looks like folks had a hard time because they didn't remove the rust first.
What I did, for better or for worse, is yesterday I soaked in a bucket of water with a couple of cups of strong muriatic acid, and then I liberally coated the racks with Naval Jelly (Phosphoric Acid).
http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7387/9568892060_e543e5ba73_o.gif
Then, when it dried in the sun, I liberally coated the entire rack with glue (I thought it was Elmers but it was Loctite latex white stuff). I let that dry overnight.
Today I was gonna buy the dishwasher stuff, but, it was only a buck or two more for the rubbery stuff, so I bought the rubbery stuff instead. Comparing ingredients, the dishwasher stuff had far fewer ingredients, but, everything in the dishwasher stuff was also in the rubbery stuff. I think the biggest problem will be these cracks: http://www.flickr.com/photos/98287134@N02/9573678516/
Hopefully the glue will hold them together.
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Bob F wrote:

Well, it might not. We'll see. The biggest mistake I made was putting the racks to dry on the cardboard box I painted them on. And then putting the second rack on top of the painted racks to dry.
What happened was the thick white rubbery paint formed blobs at the junction points.
So I scraped it off and the second time around I hung the racks from wires.
It's in the frig now, ready to be handed over to the kid for school. It's good enough for government work, or, as Oren is fond of saying, it's looks fine from here.
Thanks for all the advice, as always (you guys are great).
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Danny D.:
If you ever have to do that work again, then don't bother with paint; just use white 2 inch wide lane marking tape.
Lane marking tape has a very strong adhesive, which is also water proof. Also, lane marking tape itself is very strong because people walk on it, and they use floor cleaning machines over the tape without it coming off. And, it comes in various colours and various widths.
http://www.kaptonsource.com/images/color_lane.jpg
For example, with the rack shown in this photo:
http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7379/9568891966_2d99e79f78_o.gif
I'd just cut a piece of 2 inch wide white lane marking tape, and fold it over the edge of the rack so that the tape is 7/8 inches wide along the edge of the rack and the adhesive surfaces stick to each other between the tynes of the rack.
PS1:
Someone mentioned MEK earlier.
MEK and acetone are both "Ketones". A ketone is anything with the following structure...
A | C=O | B
Where A and B can be anything and C and O are Carbon and Oxygen atoms respectively, with a double bond between them.
If both A and B are methyl groups (-CH3), then it's called "dimethyl ketone", or "acetone" for short.
If A is a methyl group (-CH3) and B is an ethyl group (-CH2-CH3), then it's called "methyl ethyl ketone", or "MEK" for short. Or, if you're stoned, if A is the ethyl group and B is the methyl group, it's still MEK.
So, acetone (which is nail polish remover) and MEK are chemical siblings. MEK is acetone's big brother.
PS2:
Both carbon and silicon both form 4 covalent bonds. So, methane has a chemical formula of CH4 cuz the carbon atom forms a covalent bond with each of 4 hydrogen atoms.
Silicone also forms 4 covalent bonds, just like carbon, so chemists wanted to know what they'd get if they used silicon instead of carbon to make plastics.
The first successful plastic made from silicon was the silicon rubber that we still use today as silicone caulk. Chemists noticed that the number of oxygen atoms and the number of silicon atoms in the new plastic were equal, and so there was some speculation that the structure of the new plastic was that of a long ketone; like this:
| Si=O | Si=O | Si=O |
So, they combined the words "silicon" and "ketone" to name the new plastic "silicone". That's why it's Silicon Valley, but it's silicon_e_ caulk.
Well, it turns out they got the structure of silicone rubber all wrong. It turns out the real structure of silicone rubber is:
.......| .......O .......| H3C-Si-CH3 .......| .......O .......| H3C-Si-CH3 .......| .......O .......| H3C-Si-CH3 .......|
(pardon the periods)
Basically, it's a -Si-O-Si-O-Si-O-Si-O-Si-O-Si-O backbone with two methyl groups bonded to each silicon atom.
So, since it didn't look like a ketone after all, chemists quickly renamed the plastic "di methyl siloxane", but everyone still calls it "silicone" cuz the original name stuck. So, if you see anything with the word "siloxane" in it's name, it means it's a silicon based plastic.
Dow Corning has a section on it's web site explaining the chemistry and properties of silicones, or more correctly, siloxanes: 'Fascinating Silicones - Dow Corning' (http://www.dowcorning.com/content/discover/?e =)
--
nestork

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On 8/25/2013 2:17 AM, nestork wrote:

Very strong adhesive uh? I wonder how it would do to tape someone's mouth shut? I can see a "hole" new industry develop around it. ^_^
TDD
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On Sun, 25 Aug 2013 06:46:27 -0500, The Daring Dufas

Thinking of harry again? Fingers, man!
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On 8/25/2013 10:09 AM, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

Actually my roommate and his psychotic Beagle. They make more noise than a whole crowd at a football game. O_o
TDD
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nestork wrote:

I like the idea of the lane-marking tape for a wholly different reason. There is a private road nearby, where my friend, who lives on that private road, loudly commiserated with me that he wished people would stay on their side of the narrow road (which has one sharp blind curve).
We discussed a cheap way of keeping people on their side, and we were going to paint a stripe down the middle - but - the lane marking tape seems like a better idea.
Does it bend around a typical sharp curve in a road?
(I don't know how to describe the radius but cars go around it at about 20 mph and they can't see each other until it's too late.)
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'Danny D.[_10_ Wrote: > ]

> curve).

For something like that, you'd be better off with "pavement marking tape", which would be much more weather and UV resistant.
http://tinyurl.com/mxyq6f2
But, the least expensive way to do it would be to use a 3 inch paint roller sleeve to paint a stripe down the middle of the road using pavement striping paint:
http://tinyurl.com/n2hf366
Centerline Supply makes pavement marking paint in various colours, but you could almost certainly order the stuff from any of your local paint stores.
Paints used for marking highways or parking lots will be thinned with alcohol so that they dry very rapidly, and so they can be thinned with alcohol for spraying.
Painting the stripe on with a 3 inch roller sleeve would be the fastest easiest and cheapest way to do it, and would probably last longer than tape too.
--
nestork


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nestork wrote:

This makes the most sense, cost wise!
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