Do new electric dryers come with cords?

I was in Lowes last night and I noticed that none of the electric dryers had electric cords on them. Is that how they all do it?
Reason why I'm asking is because a friend of mine needs a new dryer outlet, and it's the 3 prong style. I was wondering if I should put in a 4 prong in it's place so when that dryer goes the new one will just plug in. after my trip to the store, I'm more inclined to think that since maybe new dryers don't come with cords, maybe I should just put in another 3 prong plug since that's what the existing dryer has and any potential new dryer would need a new cord installed anyway.
Can someone verify that?
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zzyzzx wrote:

Two reasons they don't:
1. Depending on the site wiring, there may be a 3 or 4 wire outlet in place, or even a wired-in pigtail from the disconnect switch.
2. Not including the cord keeps the price down and eliminates a possible UL listing hurdle.
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The three-prong connectors (or hardwired connections) for dryers and ranges is an old scheme that involved connecting ground to neutral inside the appliance. It saved copper but is now regarded as unsafe, and is against code in many places, certainly around here (where dryers and ranges are sold with cords). Under certain circumstances, a fault in a circuit or other appliance anywhere in the house could result in the entire metal cabinet of the appliance carrying a 120V charge, just as you're standing on the basement floor loading wet laundry into it.
Even if local code doesn't require it, I'd say put in a 4-prong outlet (14-30R for a dryer, 14-50R for a range, and of course you'll need to run new 4-wire cable of suitable gauge) and have such a cord installed on the appliance. If the appliance is being converted from a 3-prong setup, make sure the neutral-to-ground jumper is removed.
Chip C Toronto
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er: the entire metal cabinet of the appliance carrying a 120V charge, just as you're standing on the basement floor loading wet laundry into it.
I guess I'm safe.
My dryer is on the first floor.
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On 04/03/08 03:08 pm DerbyDad03 wrote:

I don't think so: a properly installed 4-prong setup will have a separate ground conductor to which the cabinet of the washer will be connected. AIUI, it is not permitted to have the ground and neutral connected anywhere other than at the main panel.
Perce
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"Percival P. Cassidy" wrote:

In the three wire configuration for a dryer there is a bonding strap between the ground and neutral terminals *of the dryer*. If there is a three wire cord set, there is no bonding of the house neutral and ground since both are not present on a three wire cord set.
It is possible that someone could install a four wire cord set on the dryer without removing the dryers bonding strap which would result in a bonding of the house neutral and ground which would not be to code, and is the situation that was referenced.
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re: In the three wire configuration for a dryer there is a bonding strap between the ground and neutral terminals *of the dryer*.
Could you explain that further? Where is this bonding strap you speak off?
Can I assume the bonding strap would be a jumper on the terminal strip that the 3 pronger was attached to?
I may have to go back and check my friend's dryer - the one I swapped out the 3 prong cord on - to make sure I did it correctly. I don't recall seeing a jumper, so I certainly don't recall removing one.
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Perce,
Please be careful how you edit posts. Even though your post begins with "DerbyDad03 wrote", there is nothing in there that came from me.
It looks as if you replied to my (extremely humorous) response to one of the posts in this thread, but snipped out my response making it look as if I penned the remaining words.
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Maybe this will help...
I helped a friend move into a brand new house a few weeks ago. One of things he asked me to do was change the cord on his old dryer.
It seems that by code the builder had to install a 4 prong outlet, but his dryer had a 3 prong plug. My friend had to bought a 4 prong cord and asked me to swap it.
I'd guess that the manufacturers don't know whether the dryer is going into a old set-up or new, so they leave that up to the consumer.
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DerbyDad03 wrote in message

just
Maybe this will help...
I helped a friend move into a brand new house a few weeks ago. One of things he asked me to do was change the cord on his old dryer.
It seems that by code the builder had to install a 4 prong outlet, but his dryer had a 3 prong plug. My friend had to bought a 4 prong cord and asked me to swap it.
I'd guess that the manufacturers don't know whether the dryer is going into a old set-up or new, so they leave that up to the consumer.
*****
Where I live, they won't let you use your cord from the old machine, even if it's perfectly OK. You have to buy a new one, even if it's the same type, assuming they are installing it of course. :-)
Cheri
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To change the house wiring now would be a waste of time. There's nothing 'unsafe' about the three wire setup. Just put a 3 wire cord on the dryer and be done.
s

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In order to properly install a 4 wire dryer receptacle you would have to have 4 wires available at the electrical box. You need 2 hots, a neutral conductor, and a grounding conductor. Armored cable can be used as the equipment ground. Otherwise the three wire receptacle is acceptable to use. Just tell the salesperson from wherever the new dryer is purchased that it will require a three wire cord. In many cases they will install the cord upon delivery.
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Up until recently, dryers and ranges didn't come with cords attached, for the reasons most people are giving, but in the past year or so, I've run into a number of both ranges and dryers that came from the factory with 4 wire cords attached. They also furnish a jumper kit in case you need to change the cord to a 3 wire to accommodate an existing 3 wire outlet
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The dryer I bought last year didn't come with a cord. The cord was a separate item and I needed a 3-wire one.
--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.laughingsquid.com
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