Do LED bulbs get along with lighted switches?

Hi All,
Anyone know if those new LED bulbs get along with Neon bulb lighted light switches? Do the LED's twinkle dimly like stars. (My Christmas LED lights twinkle dimly -- kind of like it. Doesn't seem to hurt anything.)
Many thanks, -T
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On 10/30/2014 12:37 PM, Todd wrote:

Works OK with the light over my vanity in the bathroom.
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On Thursday, October 30, 2014 12:37:36 PM UTC-4, Todd wrote:

I have one (older, Utilitech) LED and two CFLs over the sink in my bathroom, and the neon-lighted switch seems to be OK with it.
This reminds me, there were some really inexpensive LED round bathroom lights at Costco, I wonder if they're any good? I really hate CFLs...
nate
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On 10/31/2014 10:03 AM, N8N wrote:

I don't believe that the lighted switches (be they neon, LED, or grain of wheat bulb illuminated) would enter into the circuit at all. Maybe they would if it was a three-way switch - not sure.
About the only thing that seems to conflict with alternative light sources are dimmers and, I think, some timer switches.
I'd love to switch to either LEDs or CFLs if only I could find one whose light output matches those of the standard warm white bulbs.
I can tolerate some variance from that color temperature but SWMBO is adamant and we all know that "If momma ain't happy, ain't nobody... <g>
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On 10/31/2014 8:38 PM, Unquestionably Confused wrote:

I think you'll like some of the better brands of LED.
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On 10/31/2014 10:31 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

I agree, Ed. Unfortunately, SWMBO managed to stock up on incandescent bulbs once the handwriting was on the walls. We have a decent stock and she's just stubborn enough to hold out as long as she can which, unfortunately, may be too long for me. ;)
OTOH, my shop, my rules, etc. I've experimented with some of the better CFLs and have reasonably good experiences with them.
As you say, there seem to be a lot more acceptable LEDs out there at this stage of the game than there ever were CFLs. I know, different technology, etc. but when you see what a game changer CREE LEDs have been, you gotta sit up and take notice.
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On 11/1/2014 12:04 AM, Unquestionably Confused wrote:

It was tempting to stock up but I'm glad I didn't. I found some good CFL and now I'm finding better LED.
Take a look around you. Is there a light that is on many hours of the day? If so, you can justify taking that bulb out and replacing it with an energy saving LED. Use the old incans for the seldom used lights. Makes no sense to swap out the bulb in the spare bedroom that is on an hour a year.
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Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Hi, LED is practically running cold(no heat source) and energy use is lot less. I am all for LED now mixing warm white and day light ones.
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On 11/01/2014 10:48 AM, Tony Hwang wrote:
[snip]

A LED itself itself won't emit heat. The required series resistor (or electronic power supply) will.
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I look recently at the home depot. Some 40 &60 watts equivalents for $9 . Circular looking types, screw base. I bought a fixture with fixed LEDs for my kitchen sink. Paid $30 still need to install. Daylight looking color temp.
Greg
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On Friday, October 31, 2014 8:38:46 PM UTC-4, Unquestionably Confused wrote:

They enter into the circuit because the lighted switches rely on using the load to complete the circuit for the light. They typically don't have a separate neutral connection. That's why they won't work with some very low current loads, eg CFL lights. I wouldn't be surprised if they don't work with some LEDs either.
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On 11/1/2014 8:51 AM, trader_4 wrote:

I'll be damned. I learned something new for today so I guess I can relax and enjoy the rest of the day.
I never knew that but just checked and you are absolutely right. I always thought that it was positional thing, like maybe a mercury switch.
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On Friday, October 31, 2014 8:38:46 PM UTC-4, Unquestionably Confused wrote :

room, and the neon-lighted switch seems to be OK with it.


It's possible that they may not work as older neon lighted switches (and el ectronic timers etc.) did not have a neutral connection but relied on a sma ll amount of current passing through the filament(s) of the bulb(s) to work . If there's a neutral connection on the switch, no problem.
This I assume is the reason for the change to the NEC requiring that neutra ls be present in switch legs even if not used.
nate
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On Friday, October 31, 2014 8:38:46 PM UTC-4, Unquestionably Confused wrote:

See if you can find some of the Cree True White "bulbs" (the 2700K ones) I would have previously recommended the Philips L-Prize but sadly they've been discontinued. I haven't tried the Cree TWs myself but they are a true high CRI bulb.
nate
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The LED will produce heat. However many watts the actual LED is rated for will be the heat produced. They just don't normally produce as much heat per lum as other light sources. The resistor or other devices used to control the current/voltage to the LED element will add to that heat.
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Resistors are often used to limit current, but switching regulators are also common. Th switchers are efficient compared to resistors. The rated watts is the power input to the led. Most of that is heat. I worked on 5 watt leds a few years ago. I put 9 on a heatsink, closely spaced grid. To get maximum heat removal, I used thermal paste imbedded with diamond dust, on a copper spacer, attached to a thermoelectric plate, attached to an aluminum fan cooled heatsink. That was probably putting out a total of 60 wAtts, at least.
LEDs must be kept close to room temp if you intend to get anywher near the projected maximum life. Most lamps run too hot, so they will fail early, probably closer to 10-20 k hours.
Greg
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Short answer: Yes, they work (or at least all the ones I've tried) out ok.
Longer answer [a]: The "lighted switch" is a combination of two levels of magic. One is apparently some internal capacitance, and one is a combo of additional capacitance and very slight curent flow through the wiring and the lamp (lightbulb) in the circuit.
You'll see what I mean if you have one of these attached to an incandescent lamp. Turn it off... and note how bright the switch is. Now unscrew the lamp and (in most cases) the switch will still be lit, but at a lower intensity.
[a] I'm sure if I looked around I'd find a circuit diagram...
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