Do It Yourself -- Not

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On Wed, 25 Aug 2010 19:19:37 +0000 (UTC), Jules Richardson

The NEMA 6-15 (15a) and 6-20 (20a) are the same size as the regular 5-15 we are used to for 120v but when you get up to the 30a plugs they get bigger.
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On Aug 25, 2:19 pm, Jules Richardson

You'll find them in a lot of older homes, often with steam heat rather than a hydronic system. Some have been converted to hydronic, though. They're expensive as well as taking a lot of prime floor space.

They were installed by a moron, then. Ours had a bleed valve on each unit, as part of the automatic bleeder (which never worked).

There should be a screw in one end.

It's cheap (installation), too. Baseboard electric is even cheaper. We use AC more days than heat, so yes, there is an advantage to heat pumps here. It's crappy heat, though.

It's very nice in tiled bathrooms. ;-) Radiant ceiling heat is useless, though.

240V plugs are very similar to the 120V-20A plug, with the opposite pin, or both, rotated. Clothes dryers and ranges have larger plugs (30A or 50A). The smaller ones are often found on window or through- the-wall air conditioners. Places were 120V 15A isn't enough.
15A 120V: http://www.levitonproducts.com/catalog/Leviton_decora-duplex-receptacle-15amp-125voltnema5-15r.htm?sid=ADE2F23EFFBB2308E45CDD6B4809920A&pid=1208
20A 120V plug: http://www.levitonproducts.com/catalog/model_1433.htm?sid=ADE2F23EFFBB2308E45CDD6B4809920A&pid=1208
20A 120V outlet: http://www.levitonproducts.com/catalog/Leviton_narrow-body-duplex-receptacle-20-amp-125v-nema.htm?sid=ADE2F23EFFBB2308E45CDD6B4809920A&pid=1208
15A 240V: http://www.levitonproducts.com/catalog/model_5028.htm?sid=ADE2F23EFFBB2308E45CDD6B4809920A&pid=1208
20A 240V: http://www.levitonproducts.com/catalog/model_5821.htm?sid=ADE2F23EFFBB2308E45CDD6B4809920A&pid=1208
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Nonsense.
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On Thu, 26 Aug 2010 00:25:34 -0700, harry wrote:

Hmm, I don't recall ever seeing anything above a 13A fuse in a UK plug, suggesting that for anything more than that, there's a different style of plug to use. I certainly recall running big Sun servers off something a lot more substantial than that.
Pros and cons with plugs on both side of the Pond, really. The UK ones are bulky (I like US wall-warts where the pins can just fold away easily when not in use) but at least are fused, and the pins are strong. I've seen plenty of US houses where the outlets are getting a little tired and things are plugged into them with the pins partially exposed, which is never a good thing.
cheers
Jules
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wrote:

The US considers 240 volt 100a service the bare minimum and 400a is not uncommon. Most houses are 200a. My spa pulls 70 by itself. 11kw heat, 2.5 hp jet pump and 3/4 hp circulation pump.
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200A service with gas heat isn't at all uncommon here.
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I see you're still full of shit today, harry.
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wrote:

You are typing on it.
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On Sun, 29 Aug 2010 12:03:58 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

...and it is plugged into it, a couple of times.
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Yep, you're still as full of shit as ever, harry. No one here is surprised, though.
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Yeah. You don't need to give us any more evidence that you're full of shit, harry. You've done enough.
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No, your ass, harry. Figures, they can smell the shit from miles away.
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wrote:

The Americans got that 20 ton vacuum tube maintenance nightmare out of a big air conditioned room and into your pocket. (the microchip being the technology I was talking about).
If you want to go back 60 years, I would just go back 40 and point out who went to the moon.
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wrote:

Still pissed about how the revolution came out huh? Get over it. Without the Americans, you would be speaking German right now ... or Russian. If you noticed, the Soviets kept everything they took from the Germans
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wrote:

Lend Lease?
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He will turn out to be the 5th Bush brother after Clinton's January disclosure that he was the 4th. Everyone is giddy that BHO followed the Bush withdrawal schedule in Iraq.
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On Mon, 30 Aug 2010 00:08:03 -0400, gfretwell wrote:

I don't think it was ever air-conditioned - if I remember right, H-Block had four Colossi and F-Block had six, but they were in quite large rooms. It gets quite warm during summer in the room that the modern rebuild is in, but there's no aircon (although the false ceiling tiles can be moved out of the way to aid heat dissipation ;-)
They weren't that much of a maintenance nightmare due to the way they ran the valves (tubes) - and based on moving similar racks I'd probably put the weight at around 3 tons (not that 20 vs. 3 makes much of a difference!)
The history of computing is murky indeed, with lots of separate efforts around the same timeframe in different parts of the world, each contributing to the evolution. Inevitably one person or team gets credit for an invention, but rarely is that invention a sole product of the people who produced it. As for ICs, if I remember right the Germans, British and Americans all had a hand in it; again it was an evolutionary process. The first working one was American - but drew on theories, designs, experiences and prototypes of the Germans and Brits.
cheers
Jules
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On Sun, 29 Aug 2010 04:58:07 -0700, harry wrote:

To be honest I'd rather it be simple so that I can maintain it myself, make new parts for it if I have to etc. - and keep it running pretty much forever, rather than "forcing" some factory to provide me with some new plastic-fantastic piece of junk.
cheers
Jules
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On 8/31/2010 9:56 AM, Jules Richardson wrote:

Like an automobile? Computerizing automobiles has been both a bane and a blessing. If the computer completely dies, you're dead in the water but a partial failure can put the engine into "limp home" mode and still get you there. My older cars could be kept running with bailing wire and duct tape and would be the transportation to have if the country were to collapse and fancy new parts were unavailable. Think "Road Warrior". 8-)
TDD
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On Tue, 31 Aug 2010 23:58:18 -0500, The Daring Dufas wrote:

Yeah, been there, done that so many times. Fixed a few faults by the roadside which probably would have had me stranded in a more modern vehicle.
I don't mind computerising stuff as such - but only if I can easily get hold of the schematics, firmware code, replacement ICs etc. rather than the computer part being treated as some unserviceable black box.
cheers
Jules
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