Do It Yourself -- Not

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"More than half of young people lack the skills they need to maintain their homes, with many relying on their parents to carry out basic tasks, a survey suggested today. "Around 50 per cent of people aged under 35 admitted they did not know how to rewire a plug, while 54 per cent did not know how to bleed a radiator and 63 per cent said they would not attempt to put up wallpaper, according to Halifax Home Insurance."
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1305500/Do-Not-likely-youre-35--Survey-finds-young-people-DIY-dunces-rewire-plug.html?ITO 90#ixzz0xZu365qC
Or, in the current market, if a faucet starts dripping, walk away from your home and buy another.
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HeyBub wrote:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1305500/Do-Not-likely-youre-35--Survey-finds-young-people-DIY-dunces-rewire-plug.html?ITO 90#ixzz0xZu365qC
I have advocated for years that HS junior or senior year needed a course called 'stuff you need to know in the real world'. One semester of stuff like how to own and operate a checking account/credit card, get a consumer loan, not get bent over at the car dealer, etc. The other semester of basic mechanical and home repair tasks, like how to change a tire, how to check oil, how to not get bent over at the repair shop, how to do basic household repairs, and how to know when to attempt it yourself vs. when you should call a tradesman (and not get bent over by him either.)
Well, parents obviously ain't passing on these skill sets any more, assuming they ever had them.
--
aem sends....


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wrote:

They used to call that "shop" and "home EC"
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Perhaps in your part of the world. In the schools I attended, Home Ec was cooking and sewing, and shop was Wood Shop and Metal Shop. Both taught in Junior High (usually now known as Middle School), and it was after my era when boys started taking home ec, and girls were allowed in shop. Both were junior versions of what was called vo-ed track in High School, where they steered the non-college-track kids. None of which included the stuff that kids would need to know to live on their own. More aimed at getting them ready for pink-collar and greasy-collar jobs after graduation.
But yeah, what I am advocating is what HS shop and home ec shoulda been.
--
aem sends...


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On Wed, 25 Aug 2010 04:46:19 -0400, aemeijers wrote:

youre-35--Survey-finds-young-people-DIY-dunces-rewire-plug.html? ITO90#ixzz0xZu365qC
Home ec was the same at mine, although we had separate "design and communication" (the bit where you got to draw house plans) and "design and realisation" (the bit where you got to make towel hooks and cut your fingers off) courses - and I'm not sure if "shop" was ever really in use in UK schools.
(in all seriousness, I think the first time I heard 'shop' I assumed it was some sort of business course to do with buying and selling things :-)
cheers
Jules
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re: "Well, parents obviously ain't passing on these skill sets any more, assuming they ever had them."
Hey, kindly throw the word "some" before "parents" in your statement.
My sons know how to do lots of that stuff, and mostly because of me.
One is better than the other (has more desire - and his own apartment) but they both know the basics plus.
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DerbyDad03 wrote:

I was, of course, referring to the unwashed masses out there, not the AHR regulars. I should have made that clear. :^/
--
aem sends...

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No matter, my son does not know what end of a screwdriver to use, nor does he want to learn. Fortunately, he makes a lot of money because he'd rather pay someone to do that sort of thing for him.
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Yup-- different strokes. He's kind of the opposite of Henry Ford, who said on the witness stand when some lawyer was trying to prove he was dumb-- 'I don't need to know that-- I hire people to tell me those things'. [or words to that effect]
Jim
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Ed Pawlowski wrote:

It takes all kinds- driving a desk for a living, I consider it a good day when I get to break out the not-worth-stealing tools I keep under the desk there. Had a very happy couple of hours today blacksmithing some overpriced data center furniture y'all paid for about ten years ago, for the sole purpose of making it pretty enough that some other agency will say they want it. If I have to send it out the door via normal means, it'll likely end up in a landfill. Very therapeutic, using Harbor Freight BFH and large screwdriver and faux vicegrips, to try and bend all the slot-a/tab-b stuff enough to actually mate again. Coulda used the 3-lb engineer hammer from home- rubber mallet doesn't flatten metal very well.
--
aem sends...


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On Thu, 26 Aug 2010 05:57:16 -0400, against all advice, something

Don't you have to use both ends?
--

Howdya like that... we started playing guitar to impress the chicks and wind
up talkin' fingernails with old men.
  Click to see the full signature.
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Better yet would be to learn how to acquire such knowledge.
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I'm thinking, "what the hell is 'bleed a radiator'", not realizing, for a few seconds, this does not mean a car radiator. I suspect a large majority of folks in the US haven't a clue about how to bleed a steam radiator, having never seen one. Are there even radiators west of the Mississippi?
nb
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Or south of DC?
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On 8/24/2010 11:23 PM, notbob wrote:

When I was a first grader back in the middle of the last century, the Catholic Parochial Gulag I was remanded to had steam heat via radiators. I remember the hissing of the water separator doodad on the side of the big old silver painted cast iron radiators. It was an old building then and it had tall ceilings, transom windows, incandescent lights hanging from the ceiling that had the half silvered big bulbs and of course, no air conditioning. This was in North East Alabamastan and I don't see steam except in hospitals and very old buildings, in fact, the steam plant in downtown Birmingham is scheduled to shut down in 2013 because of of too few customers. It is supplying steam to the UAB hospital complex and other institutions in the area so UAB is looking at building its own plant for $69 million. I have done some work in the basements of some of the downtown buildings that got their steam from the existing steam plant and the area around the steam meter was a bit warm. The steam meter looks a lot like a water meter. There are steam leeks all under those old buildings and I remember a steam line bursting on a street a few years ago under a car that cooked the occupants like lobsters.
http://blog.al.com/businessnews/2010/04/uab_to_develop_steam_plant.html
http://preview.tinyurl.com/2wb86ml
TDD
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its the UK, cooler temps and all HW radiator heating
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They're pretty rare in the Midwest, too, outside of large cities.

That also accounts for "rewire a plug", I believe. Harry can tell us whether the U.K. has/hasn't standardized on a single type of plug.
Cindy Hamilton
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On Wed, 25 Aug 2010 06:56:14 -0700, Cindy Hamilton wrote:

The only types I've seen in the US are either big old cast iron ones in schools etc., or little baseboard things in homes. The latter don't seem much good for anything really (and lack bleed screws). If I could find a good local source of the types of panel radiator typically seen in the UK I'd likely dump the forced-air / electric baseboard setup that we currently have in the house.

Yes, at least for domestic AC (there are a few different types designed for less common voltages and currents, but they're not typically seen in the home. I was quite amazed when I moved to the US just how enormous the plugs and cables for 220V AC devices are (particularly as they still don't have a fuse in the plug).
cheers
Jules
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On Aug 25, 9:16am, Jules Richardson

How about the big old cast iron ones in homes?

Nope. They have them. You just didn't pay close enough attention.

Baseboard hydronic heat is pretty nice (beats the hell out of forced cold air, a.k.a. heap pump). How about radiant floors?

240V plugs are the same size as 120V; smaller than yours. 30A and 50A plugs are naturally larger.
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On Wed, 25 Aug 2010 08:17:16 -0700, keith wrote:

Never seen them, myself. I'm sure they exist (I'd love to find some of them, too - had them at the last place I worked for. Terrible to paint, but they look nice :-)

Ours* certainly don't - there's one by my feet right now. Just pipes and fins beneath a cover (I took the cover off to take a look).
* we've got a few, but no longer hooked up to anything - I'll get around to pulling them out one day.

I'm not a fan of forced air systems either - they don't seem particularly efficient or per-zone controllable, and there's all that bulky duct-work to mess around with (I can sort of see the attraction if you're living in an area that also benefits from AC, I suppose)
Heard lots of good things about radiant floors, but I don't think I've ever experienced one in use, so can't comment on how accurate the reports are.

I don't recall ever seeing a 240V plug in the US that was the same size as a 120V one - I'll have to take a better look around! (particularly as I have a few low-power 240V things to ship over from the UK some day)
cheers
Jules
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