Do I need $6,000 water softener for 12 to 14 grains of calcium in well water?

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Following up on the crud on my pool walls, I called a water softener company over who arrived today to give me a $6,000 quote to put in a water softener system in my garage. http://www.kinetico.com/assets/pdf/PDS_KineticoSeries_Softeners.pdf
Kinetico model 2060 home water system (two tanks + a brine tank, no electricity, self cleaning) $600 installation + $5400 including tax.
Here is a picture of the 'crud' on my garden hose:

The guy tested my water at 12 to 14 grains of Calcium (he said he tested a neighbor at 25 grains plus half a grain of iron which he says makes it 30 grains). He said a grain is 17 ppm so 14 grains is about the 200 ppm calcium hardness that Leslie's Pool tested the well water at.
He said up to 3 grains is soft, 6 grains is medium and 9 grains is hard, so, he said, mine is super hard.
He provided a litany of bad things that will happen, from bubbling hot water tanks with a foot of calcium on the bottom to clogged pipes and dirty shower stalls, spotty dishes, dirty clothes, and dirty cars.
The only things I 'see' are the pool has Calcium on the walls, and the kitchen kettle gets a white coating on the bottom after a week of use. I also hear the hot water tank bubbling (which he says is due to chunks of the foot-thick coating cracking and then the water hits the super hot bottom of the hot water heater and turns into steam).
While these are not good things, can't I get a home water softener for less (much less?) than six thousand bucks installed?
Oh, he said I could rent it, at $600 installation + $55 a month.
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The county changed our water recipe sometime last year and now we have a lot more calcium and lime deposits than before. We have a water softener - for the whole house - and it had always worked just fine. It still does for the most part but I have scrub to get the white spots off the sink and use Jet Dry in the dishwasher. My neighbors have the same problem -- and they have water softeners, too. The point is -- don't expect the water softener to stop your problem. It may make it less -- but that's not for sure. And my water softener - from Home Depot - was installed by my late husband. He was not the greatest handyman so if he could do it you probably could, too. He replaced another one -- so it wasn't something he had to do from scratch. I don't remember the exact cost but do know it was no where as expensive as what you are paying. It's a GE. Suggest you get several bids --
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On Thu, 17 May 2012 14:02:09 -0700, Dottie wrote:

Interesting. The salesman said that it would take the calcium down to zero grains and that every 600 gallons it would replenish itself.
He said the only thing I'd need to do is put fifteen pounds or so of salt into the brine tank twice a year (for the reflush every 600 gallons).
He said the family uses about 75 gallons per person so that's why there were two tanks.

From what I can gather, there is the existing pipe going into the tank, plus a bypass valve to bypass the system for repairs plus the system itself.
Since the system doesn't need electricity, all it needs is plumbing - which I can do, unless there's something special needed.
Now to find an equivalent water softener that can handle 14 grains of calcium (is that really a lot like the guy said ... or just normal)?
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wrote:

A softener replaces calcium ions with sodium ions, one for two. If water is let to stand, sodium will be left (instead of calcium), causing spots.

Automatic regeneration. It's generally set up to do it at night when you're not likely to use water. It is noisy, if you care about such things.

Not buying that! I was using a hundred pounds a month.

It's more than normal, since most city water is already treated but it's not a "lot" for a well. Thirty or even forty grains is a lot, but not unheard of. I few years ago, we lived in an apartment where the calcium came out as rocks. *THAT* was hard water.
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I use 100 gallons of water a day average. I add 80 pounds of salt to our EcoWater 3500 every 4 months. It's programmed to regenerate every 550 gallons.
We use Windsor System Saver pellets only.
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On Thu, 17 May 2012 23:18:40 -0400, Duesenberg wrote:

How much does 240 pounds (80x3) of salt for a full year cost?
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On 5/18/2012 12:35 AM, Arklin K. wrote:

I pay $4.88 CDN plus sales tax for a 20 lb bag at Walmart or one of the local grocery stores
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On Thu, 17 May 2012 22:24:01 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

Wow. He did NOT mention that!
He gave me a litany of the bad things that were happening due to the calcium, from: - spots on dishes - film on shower stalls - clogged pipes - clogged faucets - crusty kitchen kettles - less efficient water heater due to a foot of calcium - less efficient laundry soap & fabric softener - better tasting water
Of all those, which would replacing calcium-water with sodium-water actually solve?
BTW, about the only ones I care about are the kitchen kettle, the pipes, and the water heater.
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wrote:

It'll probably help with all of them but it's not perfect. If you let a water drop dry, it will leave a spot.
I bet he didn't mention that you'll be ingesting more sodium, either.

You shouldn't have any problem with them. Sodium (salt) dissolves readily in water.
...but... How about your pipes? ;-)
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On Sat, 19 May 2012 00:48:05 -0400, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

How does that work? Would he be getting more sodium than more people get from their home water? More than I get drinking city water, which is not hard to begin with iiuc, which comes entirely from reservoirs, fed by rain which goes directly, or which seeps through the ground, into the streams that feed the reservoirs.
Or only more sodium than he's getting now.
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A softener replaces one calcium atom with two sodium atoms. That's just what it does.

More than unsoftened water, yes. Too much, well, that depends on the people and the water (how hard).

Impossible to know.

Obviously more than he's getting now. See above.
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On Thu, 17 May 2012 22:24:01 -0400, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

I'll say.
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I had to remove the aerators on all the faucets every couple of weeks and clean them out. The calcium looked like fine sand. The water spots were *bad*. We only lived there for nine months but it was "interesting".
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On Thu, 17 May 2012 21:41:29 +0000 (UTC), "Arklin K."

He's right, but that sounds light on the salt.

It needs power for the timer and maybe a synchron motor for the valves is so equipped. In most cases, you can just plug in a power supply and can even use an extension cord.

A bit high, but not a big deal. At work, we handle 21 grains and use 5000 gallons a day. Properly sized, it is not a big deal.
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5000 gallons a day??
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You think 5000 gallons is a lot for a decent sized business?
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On 5/17/2012 11:52 PM, snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

It may be it may not be? I was hoping he'd tell me the business though. I just wanted to know what they used the water for, cleaning or brewing beer or whatever. :)
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What business is it of yours?

How about simply flushing toilets?
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Yes, business is slow right now. Mostly it should be 7500 gallons. This is used to feed two industrial boilers. I buy salt 2000 pounds at a time to.
Check out what a big hotel uses. Or bigger industry.
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On Thu, 17 May 2012 23:04:06 -0400, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Apparently the valves are all water flow based.
The salesman even went to great length to explain how the ceramic disks that determine the 600 gallon regeneration period are based only on usage and not ever on time.
He also mentioned that the water is always the already-cleaned water so that the disks themselves don't get gunked up.
http://www.kineticoofsiouxland.com/index.php/premium-green-package / kinetico-2060s
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