DIY small wood window

Re: DIY small wood window
'allo,
I have a detached garage with 2 very crude single-sash 4-pane wood windows.
Both are badly worn. The bottom sash on one is rotten and need to be replaced now. It is beyond repair.
How hard would it be to make 2 replacement windows from, say, 5/4 treated deck wood? I gotta table saw, router, drill press etc (no planer). Ran a fast Google search, found no instructions, plans.
I can probably manage the mortise/tenon for the perimeter wood elements. It's the "cross" in the middle that I haven't figgered.
Any/all suggestions welcome ...
Cheers, Puddin'
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It will be whole lot easier if you cheat - use one piece of glass for each sash and put fake mullions on the outside. (Maybe you can salvage the ones from the old sashes.)

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I wouldn't use PT lumber, I'd use regular #2 pine, and paint it. As for the mullions, if this is a utility window, just put regular rectangular strip across, and half-lap a vertical one over it, and then use the router to cut the lips to fit the glass in.
It would be easier to just user bigger glass, though.
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Make sure you paint * all * the surfaces. I find wood sash that come glazed are not painted whete the glass is seated. That leads to quick rot.
TB
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wrote:

I didn't think of fake mullions. Couldn't even 'member what they were called ... :-)

The old ones are real mullions. I'd much prefer "real" but I can't figger viable shape and wood joinery.
On Thu, 20 May 2004 14:47:06 -0400, " snipped-for-privacy@uri.edu"

The old windows appear to be pine. They didn't hold up incredibly well. The bottom sash on one evidently wicked up the rainwater, rotted 2+ " of the bottom.

Hmmmmm. I'll hafta study that a bit. If I could do it on the router table, I might try it ...

Yeah, and I don't have 40 daze/40 nites to fiddle it ...
Much thanks, Puddin'
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I was thinking you could take the old mullions and essentially cut off the back half. Looking from the front of the sash, you would cut it where the dado (for the original panes) start. That would leave you with the front shape of the mullions to stick on the outside of the new glass.
Bill
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On Thu, 20 May 2004 13:44:25 GMT, Pudding snipped-for-privacy@mail.com (Puddin' Man) wrote:

I've made afew windows in th past, but found that a local millwork shop can do them quicker, better and for about the same price as I spent in materials. If you do make your own, do as another suggested and use a single pane. Window mullions aren't difficult to make, but you'll get a better job with a single pane.
As for plans, you have them already. Disassemble the old sash.
Jeff
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wrote:

Oh, if I had serious $, I'd probably get a shop to do 'em for me, too.
I got some wood and plexiglas layin' around in the basement. The shop can likely do 'em quicker and better, but not cheaper.

I'll likely take your advice on this ...

The old sash is crumbling. And it was made in the shop. Where they had different tools and different skills. Hell, I couldn't even find any wood of really comparable (1 and 1/8 ") thickness. Home Depot 5/4 treated is hardly 1 " thick. The extra 1/8 " could make considerable difference.
I coulda maybe used a DIY plan, but I can't find any, so I'll wing it.
Thanx, Puddin'
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