DIY replacement windows - how difficult?

Just how skilled does one have to be to replace aluminum windows? I mean, what's the most trouble one could run into? Any first timers wanna share their experience?
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JaKe, Seattle
"Smooth jazz is elevator music"
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As an accomplished 'Screw-it-up-yourselfer', I have found that replacing my sliding aluminum windows with a vinyl replacements to be one of the easiest projects I have done. The key here is accuracy in measuring the opening...
Rick
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JaKe wrote:

My BIL just replaced one of mine as part of a kitchen remodel. Banged out the stucco, un-nailed the window, added wood so the new, slightly-smaller window would fit properly, nailed new window in, mixed up stucco and re-patched all around window. My 16YO son, who helped with the project, said that he could probably replace another one himself and that the hardest part would be taking care to do a neat job.
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I know God will not give me anything I can't handle.
I just wish that He didn't trust me so much. - Mother Teresa
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I just replaced an aluminum window with one of the vinyl ones from Home Depot.
It was not a big deal and I am _not_ a rocket scientist.
The slowest part was the caulking, as I was trying to make it look super.
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Lewis.

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On Fri, 09 Jan 2004 15:43:26 +0000, JaKe wrote:

The window sill and drywall will have to be trimmed by 1" or so to allow for the thicker replacement window. Use a utility knife for the drywall. Buy a new sill or carefully remove the old one and rip it to size. I located each nail and punched it thru to remove mine.
You have to trim 1 1/2" around the perimeter of the outside to access the flange. I used a skill saw in some cases but was able to remove the siding in others.
Level and nail on the new window (some say not to nail the top flange) and try to get some insulation between the window and frame. Caulk the inside and outside. Fill-in the cutout with the appropriate trim. You can also buy reno windows with a wide flange that covers the cutout from the original window.
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Martik wrote:

Yep, the trimming of window sill and drywall was the most time consuming. The window sill was the hardest part for me. I should have just removed it, but I cut it with a circular saw and then used a chisel on the corners so it too a bit of time.
A lot of installers cut the flange off and use screws in the sides, especially where there is brick siding. Not the best way but it allows you to position the window in and out to fit with the siding. Careful caulking will make the window water tight. I ripped 2x4s and routed them to form trim to fill in the siding cut out to remove the original windows. A groove, actually a lip from going deeper with a round over bit, will allow you to easily put caulk between the window frame and the trim and make it look continuous.
I would hesitate to do a window replacement if I didn't have the tools to make the the trim, but you could probably find something at a BORG. I needed 1-1/2" material and wanted my own design; besides I'm cheap.
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