Distance from Shower door to ceiling

I installed a new bathtub, and shower assembly and shower door. I need to know now much distance I need between the top of the shower door and ceiling for the moisture to vent from the shower assembly. I have about 5 inches from the top of the shower door to the top of the shower assembly. I have about 2 foot from the top of the shower door to the ceiling, I am thinking of building the 2 foot section in, and leaving about 5 inches between the shower door and shower assembly, but want to make sure I have enough room to let the moisture to vent. I hope I am explaining this so you know what I am writing about.
Jebsoc
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

bulkhead above shower door, but leave ceiling height in shower the same as out in the bathroom? The latter would be a mistake, the hot moist air would get trapped in the dead space, and you will have mildew problems. I have seen showers with a dropped ceiling level, and they feel claustrophobic to me.
If you want to put a bulkhead in above the shower door, and leave the ceiling high, you need to add a wet-rated exhaust fan above the shower. Most of them include wet-rated lights. If you close off the top of the shower door area like that, the shower is going to feel rather dark, so you will probably want a light anyway.
Personally, I'd just stay with one ceiling height, and leave the space open above. Makes the bathroom feel more open and inviting, IMHO.
aem sends...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I like the idea of having a fan in the shower and a light also is good. I also would consider lowering the ceiling just a bit so that cleaning is easier and can be done without having to use anything to stand on.
The benefit as I see it is that the steam generated from a shower is going to have to condense or be vented. If it condenses on the ceiling or walls it is an opportunity for mold or mildew but if vented, then forever it will be easier to clean the shower.
A compromise might be to lower the ceiling to about 7 feet above the tub, and have a bulk head of about 6 inches above the door. This should keep the steam in the tub area long enough for the fan to suck it out.
--

Roger Shoaf

About the time I had mastered getting the toothpaste back in the tube, then
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Then again...
http://www.sunfrost.com/efficient_shower.html
Nick
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

By built in I mean to lower the ceiling to the hight of the shower assembly, that would give me about 5 or 6 inches from the boxed in shower ceiling to the shower door for the moisture to excape. I am just not sure that is enough room. I am putting a fan in the bathroom, not one there now, an old house, but had not planned on putting one in the shower.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
(snip)

tall are you? How tall is whoever will be buying the house? Don't know about you, but when I'm in the shower, my arms at times go well higher than the plastic walls and showerhead. It's your house, so do what pleases you, but be aware that a short shower like that may be a turnoff to an eventual future buyer. I know it pisses me off when I stay in hotels with low-ceiling showers like that. I'm 6'3", so YMMV.
aem sends....
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11 Apr 2007 13:27:01 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

How much head room would that leave? Are you talking about taking 2 feet off the top? I think we already lose a half inch or more at the bottom.
How high are your ceilings to begin with.
There are a lot of people now who are 6'6" and some that are taller, plus that claustrophobia thing that someone mentioned.

I don't take hot showers so I have no way to know.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11 Apr 2007 09:01:44 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

So of the two foot 5 inch distance, the top 2 feet will be boxed in and the bottom 5 inches will be open.
I don't take showers or hot baths, so this is not an issue for me, but for those who want venting, I would have expected the vent to be at the top. But since I have no experience with humidity, what do I know?

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

So of the two foot 5 inch distance, the top 2 feet will be boxed in and the bottom 5 inches will be open.
Yes this is right, I was wondering if the 5 inches is enough space to vent the moisture. The problem I am having is this is an old house and the walls are not straight, so am having trouble putting up a wallboard on the 2 foot space and getting it even. Is there a minimum amount of space between the shower door and boxed in ceiling. Thanks for all the answers.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11 Apr 2007 13:15:47 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

AIUI, few houses have straight walls, and it's not a matter of how old they are. I'm not sure it matters how much they cost, either.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.