display utility voltage?

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Hi All,
Anyone know of a voltage meter I can plug into and sit in an electrical outlet that will display my utility voltage? (No luck with Google.)
Many thanks, -T
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Todd wrote:

Look here: http://tinyurl.com/yj865kt
Googled: energy consumption meter plug in
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Bennett Price wrote:

Thank you for looking!
Unfortunately, those are consumption meters. Rats! I want to monitor my line voltage, so I don't start my washer during a brown out.
-T
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Todd wrote:

Hi, What's wrong using multimeter? Typically brown out period is early morning breakfast time, evening supper time. We do our laundry during the day on week ends.
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Tony Hwang wrote:

I did not want the fuss. I just wanted to let it hang in the outlet and tell me the voltage
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Todd wrote:

Look more closely; some will display voltage
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Todd wrote:

a Kill-A-Watt will do both
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Radio Shack used to have a plug in meter, for about five bucks. Swing needle for voltage.
Google for "line voltage monitor" and find one for $20 at Walmart. http://www.walmart.com/catalog/product.do?product_id 742723&sourceid00000000000003260370&ci_src110944&ci_sku742723
http://tinyurl.com/ykcyr2p
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They also register voltage. You can choose voltage, amperage, and wattage, as well as KwH and cost. Mine is a UPM EM100
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-snip-

If that's all you want to do then install a Uninterruptible Power Supply with an alarm. They seem to have cleaned it up now, but when I first put in my UPS it beeped several times a week for power fluctuations that didn't bother lights, or even the TV.
If brownouts are common I'd be more worried about my computers than my washing machine.
Jim
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On Sun, 25 Oct 2009 06:55:28 -0700, Smitty Two

I vote with Smitty. Switch mode power supplies have a great tolerance for power fluctuations. Some are perfectly happy with any input from 100-250 volts without manual switching. Your basic PC supply still has a range of 100-150 or 200-250 depending on the switch setting. They also have a large tolerance to dips, and spikes.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Hi, By design they have built-in regulator that is why.
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On Sun, 25 Oct 2009 12:00:42 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Try 94 to 240
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Hi, Yes and like 32Hz to 60Hz. So CE specs. win hands down over UL spec.
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On Sun, 25 Oct 2009 12:00:42 -0400, gfretwell wrote:

ISTR some designs essentially pick one of two configurations depending on line input - i.e. if it's around 120 (US and presumably others) or around 240 (Europe). Such designs can still fry if the voltage isn't somewhere close to one of those two (i.e. giving it something like 180 for any length of time would be bad)

Yeah, they save a few cents on parts cost. Some really crap ones don't even have the switch.

Usually - or at least if something does happen it tends to kill parts that are easy to replace. Although not always - I've seen some where the entirety of the 'hot' side and half the LV side has been taken out by a fault...
cheers
Jules
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-snip-
I suppose I could argue that I really don't care if the washer dies, but it would ruin my day if my computer did.<g>
I stand corrected on that point. [near unanimity here is too unusual to go un-noticed<g>]
But I'd still go with a UPS for my computer- for all the UPS benefits-- and an audible alarm if there is a brownout.

I almost disagreed-- then remembered that the last century isn't that far back. I'm in a suburban area that still had flakey power 10 yrs ago.
Jim
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wrote:

I don't get that many brown outs but the switching transients are so bad I had to cut the wires to my UPS beepers because they were making the dog crazy. I set up my Dranitz power monitor here one day and went to work. When I got home it was out of paper.
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Smitty Two wrote:

Nevada. Yes, last century -- we like it that way. :-)
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Try this outfit:
http://www.murata-ps.com/cgi-bin/cd4power.storefront/4ae3908c112fd90a271d0c9f894206e2/Catalog/1036?defaultPanel=0
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Todd wrote:

check campingworld. A lot of Rv'r use them to monitor voltage in rv parks.
there definitely is such an animal. Plugs right in the outlet.
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