Dishwasher NOT ADJACENT sink

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h wrote:

So let's see, you rinse "all that food" into the sink to keep the dishwasher from draining it into the same drain.
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Umm...like everyone else without a disposal, my sink plug has a strainer. I rinse the dishes, pull out the plug, empty into the trash, clean out the sink, done. So, no...no food bits go down my sink. What are you, learning impaired?
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h wrote:

Well my dishwasher has a strainer so no bits go down the sink, so what's the difference?
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on 7/22/2008 7:39 AM J. Clarke said the following:

To keep it from going through some small plastic-housed electric water pump that's buried in the dishwasher and could cost $$$ to replace, then yes.
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Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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willshak wrote:

If your dishwasher is that fragile it's a piece of crap.
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Just go through the basement and back up to the sink location with 3/4 inch cpvc, then clamp the hose on the dishwasher to that.
s

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On Jul 21, 12:28�pm, "Steve Barker DLT"

gee I have exactly the same problem, KISS keep it simple stupid is my approach:)
put loop in drain line to top level of dishwasher so water cant siphon out, and run hose to basement washtub for drain.
no trap needed, no air vent needed, rubber hose snakes around many obstructions very easily.
discharge line is ty wrapped to washing machine drain hose, it dumps near top of washtub so it always drains well/.
this has worked for 12 years just fine. one day we will get a new kitchen, this year we got new furnace with air.
the only hassle is adapting the dishwasher drain hose to a regulat hose. my adapter is a rube goldberg device, wrapped with electric tape.
just search for the proper fittings.......
theres not enough width under our sink to fit a dishwasher in
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Mine is the same way, I ran soft copper in the toe kick area under the cabinets which was easily accessible by popping off the baseboard to kick to see under the cabinets, should be 4 inches of height under there to route back to the sink.
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I don't like the idea of traps hidden behind cabinets.
The directions in many/most dishwashers say the outlet should rise to a certain level and then discharge direct;u into a drain before a trap. Most machines today keep some water in the "sump."
You can consider running the drain from the D/W as far over as it can reach toward the sink and then connect it to an "air break" device which would stick up above the counter. From the "air break" the line goes directly into the drain or the disposal.
Once every few years you have problems with the D/W drain. When there is a problem you want to know ASAP rathern than find out because the water starts dripping down into the basement.

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I'm not sure of the rules for a dishwasher standpipe. However, here are the Uniform Plumbing Code rules for a laundry standpipe: receptor (opening) between 18 in and 30 in above the trap, trap between 6 in and 18 in above the floor (not below the floor).
So if you want to do this, I'd suggest using a laundry box in the wall for the receptor, and then running the trap arm horizontally in the wall to connect up with the sink drain.

Good question. Clearly 2" is adequate, since it is adequate for a kitchen sink. I'd be inclined to say 1.5" is adequate, but I can't back that up with a code citation. Dishwasher isn't broken out as a separate fixture in my code reference. You may be limited by the trap arm length-- 3'6" for 1.5" trap arm, 5' for a 2" trap arm under the Uniform Plumbing Code.

Perhaps you could just get a long dishwasher discharge hose and run it across to the kitchen sink cabinet? Not sure.
Cheers, Wayne
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