Dishwasher hot water usage

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If sanitization was truly the goal, the water would be at 212 degrees fahrenheit. According to our local health department, the combination of friction (from the water) and soap is enough to remove germs. Hot water will do a better job of loosening food that may've dried onto the dishes while they were waiting to be washed, though.
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Phisherman wrote:

You're right. Before hot water, when eating and cooking utensils were washed (if washed at all) in cold water, pathogens multiplied and the human race died off.
Home hot water cannot kill most bacteria and viruses.
I'll bet you don't even eat food that falls on the floor!
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And some believe you need your water heater at 120 to kill the pathogens,so I guess we are all going to die if we drink water from city storage tanks
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The pathogens probably thrive in a range of temperatures, such as between 80F and 105F, or some such range. The city water supply is probably below that range.
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That must mean I'm a cockroach. They survive everything man and Mother Earth has been able to conjure up for millions of years.
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Red Green wrote:

Takes a big, uh, roach, to admit that.
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On Aug 7, 4:11pm, "Steve Barker DLT"

Not all dishwashers work the same way. Many do heat the incoming water if it is not hot enough. If you want to know what your's does, you need to check on that specific model.
In any case, the answer to the question always goes back to just follow the installation instructions for the specific model you have. Don't try to outthink guys who design them.
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If you give me the full model number I MAY be able to get you the timing diagram. It has every piece of info that happens at each different cycle.
BTW, it is often tucked behind the kickplate during install for any future the service techs.
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Maytag "Jetclean Dishwasher Quiet Plus" model number MDB6100AWB.
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Sorry, was not in database. As I mentioned, it is often tucked behind the kickplate. May be taped to backside of it.
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It takes what comes out. Most instructions tell you to run the hot water in the sink until the cool water is flushed and it runs hot.

No It is designed to boost the water temperature on one or two cyles, not the entire process. You need hot water for hte best cleaning job.
If it gets cold water from the hot

Wrong
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The hot water is most needed for the rinse cycles so it's not a problem by then. If you have large diameter pipes in the hot water supply then you'll notice it won't get hot and you might want to run the hot water at the sink first, but ... usually it's not an issue. Mine runs 3/4 to 1/2 about 4' from the washer, then up in the washer's hose; the wash cycle will blast you with heat if you open the door. I think any modern washer would handle the situation. I noticed the heater element works during the first fill, so that must be to make up for cold water on ours. It's a Maytag and does a really good job compared to our old GE. Get the "quiet kit" with it; really worth it! You hardly know it's working.
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The problem here is that the hot water pipe from the house water heater seems to go under the slab foundation, and seems to be uninsulated, and the dishwasher is about 30 feet from the water heater. So even if I let the water get hot in the pipe first, it won't still be hot each time the dishwasher wants water from it.
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On Thu 07 Aug 2008 11:34:14a, Anagram told us...

This may have already been said, as I have not read the entire thread.
There are 3 basic types of dishwasher technology when it comes to the temperature of water.
Basic low-end dishwashers don't heat the water at all. They depend entirely on the proper temperature of water coming from the source.
Some dishwashers have "heat assist" but still depend on using hot water as the source. The heat assist will help to bring to maintain the proper temperature. this category probably represents most mid-line models.
Higher-end dishwashers usually have a switchable option which will heat the water to the proper temperature. The downside of connecting it to the cold water line, however, is the length of time it takes to heat each batch of water used during a full cycle. Often there one or two pre-rinses, a wash cycle (sometimes two), and anywhere from two to four final rinse cycles. Using cold water as a source could cause the full cycle to run for hours.
Our dishwasher is one that has "heat assist". I always make sure that I run the water at the faucet until it is steaming hot before starting the dishwasher. It gives the best results.
HTH
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Date: Friday, August(VIII) 8th(VIII),2008(MMVIII)

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