Dishwasher Drain

Hi,
I'm in the process of remodeling my kitchen. I just got the new dishwasher and the plumbing and electrical are done. I was going to hook the dishwasher up but the sink and sink drain are not in yet. This area used to be a bathroom and under the floor right where the dishwasher will sit is a 1.5 inch drain for a tub that used to be there. The tub drain was taken below the floor and capped. I was thinking I could run the dishwasher drain to that old tub drain but the instructions say that the drain for the dishwasher must be at least 20 inches above the floor. Does anybody know why this is? Will I flood my kitchen if I use the drain under the floor? Will the dishwasher not drain properly? What if I ran the drain hose up 20 inches and then down in to the floor, would that work?
Greg
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snipped-for-privacy@windsweptsoftware.com (Greg) writes:
| I'm in the process of remodeling my kitchen. I just got the new | dishwasher and the plumbing and electrical are done. I was going to | hook the dishwasher up but the sink and sink drain are not in yet. | This area used to be a bathroom and under the floor right where the | dishwasher will sit is a 1.5 inch drain for a tub that used to be | there. The tub drain was taken below the floor and capped. I was | thinking I could run the dishwasher drain to that old tub drain but | the instructions say that the drain for the dishwasher must be at | least 20 inches above the floor. Does anybody know why this is?
In the good old days, most dishwashers included a positive-closing solenoid drain valve that would open only during the drain cycle. The original dishwasher in my ~1959 house worked this way and was plumbed directly into a drain trap below the floor. Unfortunately, the drain valve was eventually cost-reduced away in the eternal quest to maximize profit margin. With no valve, the water can drain out at any time if the end of the drain hose is too low.
| Will I | flood my kitchen if I use the drain under the floor?
Probably not.
|Will the | dishwasher not drain properly?
It will drain just fine--even when you don't want it to.
|What if I ran the drain hose up 20 | inches and then down in to the floor, would that work?
Perhaps. Some manufacturers even offer that as a legitimate installation option. Without a vacuum breaker at the top of the loop this arrangement can still allow siphoning. But beware: unless the manufacturer specifically mentions the high-loop option you might have problems. (I've had problems even when they did.) Some models are so cost-reduced that they don't even have a single "real" valve to select between drain and circulate. Instead they have a little flapper that the controller tries to manipulate by pulsing the pump just so. This operation appears to depend critically on the drain's back pressure. If you don't have what is currently thought of as a standard installation (open drain) it can fail...
                Dan Lanciani                 ddl@danlan.*com
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snipped-for-privacy@windsweptsoftware.com (Greg) wrote in message

Hi,
The water may syphone out of the d/w if the drain is too low or has a too long of an vertical drop.

Probably not.

The d/w may even drain when you don't want it too.

Up to the bottom of the kitchen cabinet and then down will help, but may still need a syphone break or such to prevent the water from leaving the d/w prematurally.
http://www.applianceaid.com/pictools/drain_help.JPG
http://tinyurl.com/3ywhr Installing a d/w helps.
jeff. Appliance Repair Aid http://www.applianceaid.com /
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