DISHWASHER DOOR


The nylon rollers have worn a hole in the inside of my dishwasher.
It's 30 years old but the new ones only go 7 years, so I want to keep it. It's sound mechanically.
How or what should I use to patch the inside of the door?
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A thirty year old dishwasher? That's amazing. What brand is it?
My parents home was built in 1969. They've been through at least 4 dishwashers in that time (first a Whirlpool, then a Kitchenaid, then (I think) another Whirlpool, now a Kenmore). I believe all of these brands are made by Whirlpool and are considered to be good quality. I can't imagine that a dishwasher from 1976 is still running...
If you've actually worn through the door, I think it's time to shoot the puppy in the head, unfortunately. Also I can't imagine it looks terribly modern anymore...
-Tim (who just replaced a 1996 Maytag that was pretty much rebuilt (new logic board, pump, and motor) in 2002).
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote in

Worn a hole? You mean in the white finish where they roll? Or do you mean a hole clear through? If the latter you just may have to take a 7yr one and suck up that they don't make 'em like they used to. I guess you could try to patch a hole with some epoxy, resin or the like and cover with maybe porcelain paint. Gotta be able to withstand the heat That's just a WAG.
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On 6 Oct 2006 16:59:11 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

If it is all the way through, I think auto body putty would do it. I think they have a couple general kinds, for small dents and for larger that is sometimes supported by a piece of fiberglass mesh.
I can't imagine the hole is bigger than a dime, so I think you can use the small dent stuff and just leave the door open, (the hole is in the door, right?) and push enough through so that it lands on the far side (now the bottom side) and keep applying it until the pile reaches up to the level where you are. You can onoy apply it a half inch deep at one time, or something like that. Read the label. So do it in stages. When it reaches the hole smooth it out. You may want to paint it with the little bottles of white porcelain paint they sell for kitchen appliances (only in colors that appliances come in.)
I live alone and only wash full loads, so Idon'pt use my dishwasher very often, but it's 27 years old, and works and looks fine, and has only broken once when a tiny half inch long very thin chicken bone got caught in the anti-siphon thing on the sink. And t hat wouldn't have happened if I cleaned my dishes better.
I wouldn't care about style, but afaict mine is still stylish.
It's a sears, probably whirlppol and has 3 sheets of metal stored in the front, representing 6 colors**, if I wanted it to be adifferent color. So far everything is harvest gold. Now that IS out of style, but I don't care.
White, harvest gold, ovacado?, and I forget the other three. I've only seen them once 15 years ago, because I have to take out two screws and remove a strip to look at them.
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It was harvest gold but I painted it white hahahah
I was thinking a bike tire patch with cement glue.
I am hanging on to the bitter end.
Mrs. Clean
mm wrote:

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White, harvest gold, avocado green, sunset orange, something brown, almond? Great selection!
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That might be it, and I hope so because they still sell almond. I can't imagine my stove really breaking, but the fridge could.
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On 7 Oct 2006 12:14:20 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Why not some aerosol foam insulation into the hole, then cut and sand it off even with the rest of dishwasher.
I have a can of that aerosol stuff but I don't know what color it is inside. White maybe.

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wrote:

Are you talking about "Great Stuff"? That stuff isn't terribly waterproof, and I doubt it would hold up to the heat of a dishwasher...
-Tim
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Mrs Clean, I think you are at the bitter end on this DW. I don't know what kind of floor you have, or what is on the floor below you kitchen, but a water leak would be pretty damaging to both. Also at 30 years your DW is probably not all that efficicient as far as water and electric use, so a new one would likely pay for itself in a few short years. You'll also be surprised at how quite a new one is!
Give it up - give the thing a kiss on the control knobs and drag it to the street! You are right, you probably won't get 30 years out of a new one - But you are really fortunate to have had the old one live that long!
Mark
P.S. That old harvest gold refrig should probably go too! I know a new one would save you $$$ in operating costs!
wrote:

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I replaced the refrigerator (harvest gold) first thing. It didn't involve a big installation.
I avoid the labor charges, being a woman alone and all. I may take on installing a new dishwasher after I hang my Electrical Service Panel today.
I was quoted $400 to install an electric oven. There's already one in there wired up, I can't see letting them rip me off. I will get one wired virtually the same, pull, drop new one it, and see if I need to get help doing it instead of paying the upfront fee with no justification except "$400 because they can be complicated."
I actually believe electricians are the biggest thieves around, ahead of lawyers.
Mark wrote:

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$400 to install an oven is insane. The only thing you might need help with is lifting out the old one and lifting in the new one (assuming they are the same size, etc).
Appliance dealers mark up the delivery/installation as a major profit center. They always groan a bit when I tell them I intend to install myself.
We just bought an LG dishwasher. Home depot said that they normally charge $150 for a DW install, but that model was "really hard" so they charge $250. I bought it from a different source, and installed it myself, and saved $450 between the marked-down price and the DIY install. It was a bit finicky to install but I got it done in an hour or so. If an amateur can do it in an hour, it probably would take the pros 1/2 hour. Must be nice to make $500/hour...
-Tim
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote in wrote:

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It's one thing to say that about AC's and fridges and furnaces, where I think there have been technical advances, but the DW has a motor, and a heater to heat the water. How have they improved such things in the last 30 (or even 50) years? Did a dishwasher use even a gallon of water 30 or 50 years ago. How much less water could it use now?

Everytime this is said, I'm uneasy, and I've figured out two reasons.
Posters take the price of the item P, and the amount of money thought to be saved each year S, and the number of years before the new item wears out Y, and they multiply S x Y and if SY is greater than P, they say there will be savings.
But does anyone consider A) the lost interest on P? If P is 200 dollars, it would be earning about 10 dollars a year in anything better than a straight savings account.
or B) that by waiting several more years W to replace the item, the new item purchased then might save even more electricity, etc. and have more new features than if purchased now; and will last that many years W longer than the same item purchased this year. Even perhaps 2W years if again the homeowner isn't quick to replace what other say should be replaced. Again, when the item is replaced a second time, the new item will be W years more recent.
These two factors apply to refridgerators, AC, and furnaces, as well as dishwasher.

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Dishwashers, particularly older ones, use a lot more than "a gallon" of water. Newer ones use less.
Newer dishwashers are practically silent compared to old ones. Our brand new one is so quiet that you barely know it's running when you're standing right next to it. The PC I'm typing on right now, which I consider pretty quiet, is louder than our DW.
Newer DW's tend to clean much better than old ones.
The above may not be true if you're buying a bottom-of-the line, sub-$400 dishwasher today.
-Tim
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