Dishwasher - don't rinse first?

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Have seen lately publicity for new dishwashers that actually WANT the user to not rinse off particlate matter before placing item in DW. They seem to claim that the DW is actually DESIGNED to work better with a lil' bit of schmutz.
I can see catering to very lazy people by not requiring rinsing before insertion, but redesigning the whole thing for them?
This sounds nuts to me. Is it true? If so, is there a solid technical reason why the DW is so designed?
TIA
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I don't know about the "schmutz" factor nor your laziness claim, but Consumer Reports says it's about the energy that's wasted when pre-rinsing.
http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/news/2012/04/stop-pre-rinsing-and-let-the-dishwasher-do-its-job/index.htm
Not only do you waste water (6000 gallons per year?) but you waste the energy required to heat it.
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On Wed, 13 Nov 2013 20:58:51 +0000 (UTC), DerbyDad03

That was what I learned when I bought one a few years ago. They recommend not scraping. That had no impact on the Significant Other who insists on prewashing. I just shove them in unless they're just too icky; then I also rinse them. They usually come out fine without being pre-rinsed.
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Consumer Reports uses the worst possible scenario figures. No reason to heat the rinse water. Where did the 16 gallons a day come from? I bet I don't use half a gallon on the worst day. I gave up reading CR decades ago for just that reason. Can't trust them.
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That why I added the ? after the 6000. Sounded outrageous high to me too.
However, the comments related to the wasting of water and energy if you use hot water to rinse, as I'm sure many, many people do, is valid.
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On Thursday, November 14, 2013 7:36:27 PM UTC-8, DerbyDad03 wrote:

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I need to find out whether you and Ed and others, when discussing pre-rinsi ng, mean RINSE CYCLE IN DW or (as I intend) QUICK RUN UNDER WATER FAUCET.
Would make vast differences in projected water usage.
(However, even when just "quick run under water faucet", must take into acc ount energy used in heating water, so pref, use cold.)
We are only one modest-using household. But multiplied by millions, some m ore profligate, and given future water shortages in some areas of the count ry, it behooves us to define our terms. (One of the two buzzwords way back at university. The other was "what's your frame of reference". Both quite useful.)
HB
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On Friday, November 15, 2013 8:42:08 AM UTC-5, Higgs Boson wrote:

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sing, mean RINSE CYCLE IN DW or (as I intend) QUICK RUN UNDER WATER FAUCET.

Both approaches have been mentioned, but in what I wrote above and what I think they are talking about is rinsing by hand.

And which way do you think uses vastly more?

ccount energy used in heating water, so pref, use cold.)

I would think a quick run under the faucet for most of what goes into the DW could easily use a lot more water than running the rinse cycle on the DW.

more profligate, and given future water shortages in some areas of the cou ntry, it behooves us to define our terms. (One of the two buzzwords way ba ck at university. The other was "what's your frame of reference". Both qui te useful.)

I already don't rinse. So no issue here at all.
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I can only speak for myself, but I meant that you probably waste more water and energy by using the sink to rinse the dishes vs. using the Rinse cycle of the DW. I've never measured the usage, but it would be easy enough to do just by checking the meter.
However, the energy usage required to heat the water is a bit harder to quantify, especially if you only rinse one or 2 dishes per sink based pre-rinse. In other words, if you wait for hot water to sink rinse a plate or 2 at breakfast, then do it again after lunch and then after dinner, I'd imagine you'd waste more energy than if you stuck them in the DW and ran the Rinse cycle once a day.
Trust me, most dishes can sit unrinsed for more than a day in the DW and still come out perfectly clean once the full cycle is done. We do it all the time.
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On 11/15/2013 8:42 AM, Higgs Boson wrote:

I'm referring to the running under the faucet when loading the DW. I may use a quick "psst" under the faucet on the really messy stuff. I've measure it to be about 4 ounces of water and I may do that on four items, total 16 ounces per day. That is 45 gallons a year of cold water, not the 6000 gallons of hot water referenced by CR.
We never use the Rinse Only cycle. When it is full, or nearly so, it gets run.
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On Thursday, November 14, 2013 10:36:27 PM UTC-5, DerbyDad03 wrote:

The reason most people will use hot water when rinsing dishes by hand is that it's not very comfortable running cold water over your hands in winter. And I know people who just about wash them clean before putting them in the dishwasher, which is done easier with warm water than cold. Grease doesn't come off very well with cold water.
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On 11/15/2013 9:23 AM, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

I hold the dish by the edge and my hand stays dry. I let the machine take care of great, I just get rid of big solids.
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On Friday, November 15, 2013 10:43:35 AM UTC-8, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

That's about the way we operate. We don't worry about grease; that's what DW is for. But of course scrape as much as possible into trash to avoid fu ture line problems. As to cold water on hands (horrors!<g>) c'mon!
What I DO worry about -- shifting topic slightly -- is the long time it tak es for the hot water to get from kitchen boiler to bathroom, while faucet r uns, WASTING water. Some people actually keep a bucket in the shower and u se cold water for plants, etc.
I made a huge mistake decades ago when remodeling bathroom in NOT installin g one of those electric heaters -- "point of demand" or some such terminolo gy. By now, the technology must be light-years ahead.
This area (So. Calif) would be a desert if water hadn't been brought down f rom the Sierra Nevada (100 years since Mulholland!). With global warming - ---ing everything up world-wide, if the snowpack in the Sierra is scarce fo r several years, water will be scarce and rationing might follow. What a c an of beans, considering how some people cooperate -- but many do not.
HB
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Keeping on topic, I have seen it suggested that you run the tap on full hot until hot water reaches the kitchen sink before turning on the dishwasher. This ensures that the very first bit of water that enters the DW is piping hot, therefore better to rinse the dishes during the first cycle.
If you do that, I guess you might as well rinse a dish or two at the same time.
I don't have to deal with that since my DW is almost directly above my WH. It takes just a couple of seconds to get full hot water to my kitchen sink and DW.
Now, the shower on the opposite side of the basement is a different story. I really should install a recirc pump, but I just haven't gotten a Round Tuit.
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On Friday, November 15, 2013 11:33:34 AM UTC-8, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Damn, damn, damn! I remember now being told about running the hot water before starting the DW!
Another thing: They (gas co) tells you to keep the temp in the WH at medium. ISTR checking into this -- supposed to be to protect people from themselves; the same idiot-proof legal language that can be seen on everything from packaging to...
I have had the WH temp boosted to HOT for years.
Did I done do sumpin' wrong?
HB
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The safe temperature to prevent scalding of young children, the elderly or anyone that can't move fast enough to get away from the water or turn it off quickly is 120F. 125F and above can be dangerous.
https://www.energyguide.com/library/EnergyLibraryTopic.asp?bid=austin&prd &TID322&SubjectID86
It's got nothing to do with idiot-proof legal language and there's no law that says you can't shower in boiling water if you so choose - other than the laws of nature and how they apply to your epidermis.
However, if you have small kids, the elderly or a disabled person that might visit and use your hot water, it might be considered a nice gesture to keep it at no more than 120F for safety reasons.
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On Friday, November 15, 2013 3:49:50 PM UTC-8, DerbyDad03 wrote:

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Thanks for that.
I visited the site, and have one q:
Heading: "Reducing the amount of heat that is lost out of the hot water ta nk (known as stand-by losses). If appliances, such as clothes washers and d ishwashers, use hot water at the temperature supplied by the water heater; and do not mix this water with cold water to achieve a set hot water temper ature, additional savings will occur."
How do I know what the HOT setting on my CW means? I've seen that it feeds HW and CW alternately, but to what final temp?
WH is in a corner, hard to see; will ask Gas Co. when they come to relight/ check my room heater** and other gas appliances.
Same with DW. It's got a HOT setting, but what does that mean?
Both happen to be Whirlpool; no special reason. Guess I'll have to get on the phone to them and pose my questions -- unless the answers happen to be readily available here..<g>
** I lit/shut off RH myself for years, but now the gas co guy is welcome t o get down on the floor
HB
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Our "pre-rinse" cycle is to set the dishes on the floor for the dog to lick clean. Dishes emerge from the dishwasher sparkling.
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On Thursday, November 14, 2013 1:41:27 PM UTC-8, Doug Miller wrote:

ing.

ck clean. Dishes emerge from the dishwasher sparkling.
Darn it! If we could just teach the CAT to do that! But he is SO picky ab out his food! I think he actually has a food neurosis. He can have a full dish of chow plus a dish of canned food sitting right there. But he will come back to the office, jump on my computer keys and otherwise become a nu isance until I give up & go out to the kitchen to perform the ceremonial ac t of adding a few grains to his dish. Thus served, the Prince will condesc end to eat.
HB
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On 11/14/2013 4:55 PM, Higgs Boson wrote:

that! But he is SO picky about his food! I think he actually has a food neurosis. He can have a full dish of chow plus a dish of canned food sitting right there. But he will come back to the office, jump on my computer keys and otherwise become a nuisance until I give up & go out to the kitchen to perform the ceremonial act of adding a few grains to his dish. Thus served, the Prince will condescend to eat.

Has Prince ever lived in New Orleans? How does Prince vote, each November? Does Prince have any bumper stickers, like Obama 2012?
--
.
Christopher A. Young
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Doug Miller wrote:

Hi, Some new DWs even has soil sensor which dictates wash/rinse cycle when operating.
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