Disconnecting Generac Generator

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Hi All, We are disconnecting and removing a 10kw generator. There is an automatic transfer connected to the main panel isnide the house. Is there anything that must be done after disconnecting the outside cable and low voltage connector that are in the disconnect box mounted on the outside of the house except locking it. Thank you.
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No, assuming it's disconnected by removing wires from the terminals of the disconnect. On the other hand, if it were disconnected from some arrangement where there are bare wire ends of what were current carrying conductors left in the box, then I would put wire nuts over them.
One thing is a bit troubling though. You say there is a low voltage cable in the disconnect box? If that is true, it must be in a seperate section of the box, seperated by a divider from the line voltage part.
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wrote in message wrote:

No, assuming it's disconnected by removing wires from the terminals of the disconnect. On the other hand, if it were disconnected from some arrangement where there are bare wire ends of what were current carrying conductors left in the box, then I would put wire nuts over them.
One thing is a bit troubling though. You say there is a low voltage cable in the disconnect box? If that is true, it must be in a seperate section of the box, seperated by a divider from the line voltage part.
Thanks for input. I'm assuming the small gauge wires with snap-type connectors are low voltage or signal wires of some type. They was a brief reference in the manual. I don't see any way to isolate them from the terminal block that's in the box except to tape up what will be the remaining end of the plastic connector.
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*Those wires are not low voltage. They sense when power is lost at the main circuit breaker panel. There should be a two pole 15 or 20 amp circuit breaker in the main panel that they are connected to. Disconnect them from that circuit breaker and tape the ends. That may affect the transfer switch operation and put it into emergency power mode. You could label the wires for future knowledge.
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"John Grabowski" wrote in message

*Those wires are not low voltage. They sense when power is lost at the main circuit breaker panel. There should be a two pole 15 or 20 amp circuit breaker in the main panel that they are connected to. Disconnect them from that circuit breaker and tape the ends. That may affect the transfer switch operation and put it into emergency power mode. You could label the wires for future knowledge.
You are correct. The 4 small gauge wires go from the exterior into the transfer switch and connect to a block. Two of them up to 2 cartridge fuses and the other two go to the solenoids. The only breakers involved in the main house panel is the 70A feed to the auto transfer switch plus of course the breakers for the circuits in both panels. There is also a double pole breaker on the control panel of the generator itself along with a separate 15 amp fuse that protects the DC control circuit. Thanks.
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I don't know who did the install, but it's a code violation to have low voltage control wires in the same box as line voltage conductors. The exception is if there is a permanent divider that seperates the two, which is done in some equipment.
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On 9/20/2012 12:06 PM, John F. F. wrote:

I installed quite a few some years ago and the control electronics are inside the generator housing. In the transfer switch there are a number of small cartridge fuses and you should remove those on the control wires going to the generator. There should be a diagram on the inside cover of the transfer switch showing all the connections. I'm assuming it is one of the older liquid cooled 4cyl Turkish Fiat engines Generac was using about 10 years ago. If it is that model, I have a manual and could dig it out of my service van and give specific information but if you can read the diagram on the inside of the transfer switch cover, it should be a simple job. I'm wondering why you're removing it, is it broken? O_o
TDD
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"The Daring Dufas" wrote in message
On 9/20/2012 12:06 PM, John F. F. wrote:

I installed quite a few some years ago and the control electronics are inside the generator housing. In the transfer switch there are a number of small cartridge fuses and you should remove those on the control wires going to the generator. There should be a diagram on the inside cover of the transfer switch showing all the connections. I'm assuming it is one of the older liquid cooled 4cyl Turkish Fiat engines Generac was using about 10 years ago. If it is that model, I have a manual and could dig it out of my service van and give specific information but if you can read the diagram on the inside of the transfer switch cover, it should be a simple job. I'm wondering why you're removing it, is it broken? O_o
TDD
This is only 5 years old and is air cooled. I appreciate your offer to round up a diagram but I located the manual. Thanks.
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WHY IS THE GENERATOR BEING REMOVED?
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On 9/20/2012 7:21 PM, John F. F. wrote:

It must be the big honkin air cooled V twin that Generac builds for itself now. That's a heck of a motor and what was in the last one I installed. 5 years is a young age for one of those gensets, did it break or is it being removed for other reasons? I was just wondering. If it's being moved to another location, it's not too difficult to remove and reuse the transfer switch. O_o
TDD
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On 9/20/2012 1:06 PM, John F. F. wrote:

What is the reasoning for leaving the transfer switch in place?
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Probably because it's a lot more work to take it out and by leaving it there another generator could be installed someday if one chooses. I wouldn't take it out either.
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wrote in message wrote:

Probably because it's a lot more work to take it out and by leaving it there another generator could be installed someday if one chooses. I wouldn't take it out either.
Correct.
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why is the generator being removed?
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On 9/22/2012 8:52 AM, bob haller wrote:

That was my question too. Interesting how definitive statements are made when only minimal details are presented.
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People should absoloutely not make definitive statements when they are unsure the relevant details.
I don't remember reading the reason for the removal. We still don't know.
That transfer switch needs to go!!!!! (ha, ha)
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .

That was my question too. Interesting how definitive statements are made when only minimal details are presented.
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Actually your question was:
"What is the reasoning for leaving the transfer switch in place? "
And the OP affirmed it was because it's more work to take it out and leaving it in allows a generator to be installed in the future. And it's probably a LOT of work to take it out, if the transfer panel has the circuits to be supported by the generator wired to it. You'd have to move all those back to the main panel. I'd ask you what is a compelling reason to take the transfer switch out? I can't think of one.
Leaving it in, if you wanted to, you could add a standby generator at any time. It could very likely be used with a portable generator as well. If you go to sell the house, I'd even put that in the listing as a selling point.
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wrote:

I still ask:( WHY IS THE GeNeRaToR being removed........
I dont care about the transfer switch!!!
it just seems strange to remove such a signifcant asset from a building.....
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On 9/22/2012 9:16 PM, bob haller wrote:

I'm demoing the first floor of my house, what's the best way to knock out the support beams? I believe someone would ask why are you doing that? Why are you leaving the second floor intact? ^_^
TDD
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IDK, but my first guess would be that it's kaput and they don't use it enough to justify the replacement cost.
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