Disconnecting drilled well


I need to disconnect electrical and water lines from a drilled well. I'm hoping that the electrical can simply be disconneced at the top of the well. The water supply will eventually be re-routed to a new location. I'm not sure how and where I should disconnect the water supply line. This is all in preparation for a controlled burn of the house currently supplied by the well. I'm not sure if I need to dig down to disconnect first or if I can just cut the line at the current house entrance and then wait until new excavation to reroute. Main electrcial has already been disconnected. Any advice is appreciated.
Thanks in advance, KG
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

There is already a water tight splice down in the well at the pump so it is no big deal to add another above ground wherever you choose. Noting its location for future reference may be handy. Im assuming its a deep well (pump in the hole) as you say the power has already been cut. What would be best would be to pull all the existing wire out of the existing house if possible leaving a coil of wire out in the yard. If it was long enough you could simply reroute it to the new residence. If not you would have to splice on a new piece or choose to pull the pump and run a new continuous line from the pump to the new house.
You can also splice the water line anywhere above ground or if you choose you could run a new line from the pitless adapter to the new house at a later date leaving no below ground splices.
In both cases there are already below ground connections even in a new system so having one more isnt a major issue though its nice to avoid it if possible.
Mark
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On Mar 4, 1:53 pm, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Maybe depends on how close the well is to the house. You can disconnect the electric at the service panel. You should be able to then pull that wire to the point it goes underground. Similarly, you can unhook the water line where it meets the pressure tank or whatever.
Both the wire and the pipe go below ground at some point. If you wish to preserve those lines from this fire then you may want to excavate them to a safe distance. Perhaps some provision can be made to protect them. Roll them up underneath a metal box or old bathtub to protect from sparks and such.
It could be a lot of digging. At my place, for example, both lines enter the soil right next to the house. I was there when the hole was dug and it goes straight down eight feet before it makes a turn towards the well.
The alternative is to just cut those lines where they enter the ground and sort the details after the fire. If you abandon that well it is necessary for you to have it properly capped by a liscensed professional.
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On Mar 4, 11:53 am, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

If you are not trying to salvage anything prior to the burn, just cut off the electric and that is all that is needed. If salvagine tank, controls etc, then just unscrew as necessary and remove. Don't need to do anything to any pipe/wire that you leave. Any exposed wire or pipe will be trashed but only for a about a foot past the point it enters the ground. Your reconnect and reroute can be sorted out at any convenient point from the existing house back to the well head. Dig down at the desired location cut the existing pipe, rethread (if it's iron) and go with the new trench. Same with the wire, dig enough to expose enough for a waterproof connection, cut, splice (use an underground splice kit) and go.
Harry K
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