Disconnecting a gas dryer

I have to disconnect our gas dryer for a few days and move it out of the room it in because we are having a new floor put down in the laundry room.
I see that the pipe leading to the flex pipe has a little lever on it and I already tested shutting that valve and proved that the dryer did not work when that valve was shut. So I know how to shut the gas to the dryer off.
So it seems like this should be pretty simple. Shut the valve off. Unplug the drier. Use a wrench to loosen the flex pipe off of the drier so I can move it to another room while the floor is put down.
Do I need to cap the flex pipe while the drier is not in the room? That would add another level of safety in case that valve I mentioned is faulty.
Then when I put it back I just tighten the flex pipe back on to the dryer, turn the valve back on, plug it in and it should be good to go.
Do I need to use some sort of sealer when putting attaching the flex pipe back onto the drier?
Should I get a plumber to do this? I am reasonably handy but I am no plumber. I lit the pilot light to our gas burner this morning and that was no big deal. Working with gas always scares me.
I would appreciate feedback on my plan outlined above and any tips or suggestions on how to do this safely.
Thanks in advance.
Steve
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Not a big deal to shut it off. Just shut off the valve and disconnect it. But you should probably get a plumber to reconnect it. It's easy to have gas leaks. If you do reconnect yourself, note where sealant has been used, get a new flexible hose, and test very carefully with watered down solution of dish soap when you're done. You spoon the solution onto connections. Like bubble- blowing liquid, it will blow bubbles if there are any leaks.
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In typed:

What you are describing is fine. I assume by "flex pipe" you mean the flexible gas line. You can either disconnect it where it connects to the dryer or disconnect it where it connects to the shutoff valve. Use two sets of adjustable end wrenches or channel lock pliers etc. when doing it. One holds the fitting on the dryer or the valve so it doesn't turn, and the other is used to unscrew the flex pipe off of the fitting. I'd bet there is a YouTube for this. Go to http://YouTube.com and search for disconnect gas dryer or something similar.
To Re-Connect the flexible gas line: Depending on the fitting, you can either use a little "pipe dope" (usually called RectorSeal -- a brand name -- I think) on the threads, or you can use some yellow Teflon tape that is made for gas lines on the threads.
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In typed:

Here's one YouTube example:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=idUF6Yzh8jE

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You should check the color of the flex pipe. If it is brass or bronze colored replace it immediately. They have a habit of developing cracks when you move the appliance and are no longer allowed. If it is stainless steel or covered with yellow plastic, it may be OK but it would be wise to get a new one and some pipe dope for gas lines and follow the directions on the new flex pipe.
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In

Interesting. A friend of mine mentioned that recently (about not re-using the same flexible gas line) when we were replacing a gas dryer with a new one. He said something about hearing that the old ones can crack, but we ended up just re-using the old one anyway. We decided that if we detected any problems or gas leak after the switch, we would just get a new line.
But, I had never heard that the brass or bronze colored ones were no longer allowed. I haven't checked, but I assume that means that they no longer sell that type.
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On 11/29/2014 11:24 AM, TomR wrote:

You can often tell from the smell of gas or from the flames coming from the dryer area. Sometimes you get a small exposlion as a reminder.
Is it worth putting your house and maybe your lives at risk for a $15 gas line?
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On 11/29/2014 12:12 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

I wait till the smoke is down about waist high.
- . Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
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| > You should check the color of the flex pipe. If it is brass or bronze | > colored replace it immediately. They have a habit of developing | > cracks when you move the appliance and are no longer allowed. | | Interesting. A friend of mine mentioned that recently (about not re-using | the same flexible gas line) when we were replacing a gas dryer with a new | one. He said something about hearing that the old ones can crack, but we | ended up just re-using the old one anyway. We decided that if we detected | any problems or gas leak after the switch, we would just get a new line. | | But, I had never heard that the brass or bronze colored ones were no longer | allowed. I haven't checked, but I assume that means that they no longer | sell that type.
A plumber in MA told me it was a legal requirement to replace any flexible hose. That makes sense to me. It might be a bit wasteful, but a leak can be disastrous, and flexible hose for gas was really never a great idea in the first place.
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In typed:

I wasn't saying that what we did was a good idea. But, that's what we did.
I have moved gas ranges and gas dryers before many times to get access behind them and I never replaced the flexible gas line just because I was doing that move. I, of course, looked to see if the original gas line appeared damaged etc. And, in the case of the gas dryer replacement that we did, we really didn't even need to move or bend the flexible gas line. We just disconnected it from the dryer, then moved the dryer, then put the new dryer in place, and then reconnected the original flexible gas line to the new dryer.
Still, I know enough to check to make sure everything is good to go and that there are no gas leaks after making any gas connections, including that there are no leaks in the flexible gas line. There is always some risk of causing a gas leak, even if I was replacing the original flex line with a new one.
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I DETEST that corrugated gas-line being used by virtually all gas installers today because they are too lazy to thread iron pipe. I can see it for stuff that moves, like a drier, but using it for main gasfeed is like wiring a house with extension cords.
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I am in the middle of replacing 2 washers and 2 dryers. I needed to quickly get the old units to the scrap yard, and the gas line had a main valve AND individual valves to each dryer.....
Well I had great troubles getting the one line off:( a buddy was there to help load the old appliances..
So in a rush I tried to intentially break the old flexible line, it bent repeatedly but didnt break, I finally cut it with a bolt cutter...
I have new respect for those flexible lines they are really very durable:)
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