Dip-stripping company in Boston area?


Looking for companies that "dip strip" doors and moldings to remove layers of old paint -- I am in (near) Western suburbs of Boston.
Also, does anybody know what the typical cost is to dip a door? What about moldings?
Thanks
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Have you tried using a heat gun?
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On 5 Feb 2007 13:23:38 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

If he has, that's probably why he's looking for a dip stripper.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com writes:

Well doors have 100+ years of lead paint etc. so probably not good to use a heat gun. Plus, I would prefer the convenience of a dip rather than hours and hours of hand scraping/heating/chemicals etc...
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dipping doors tends to break down the glue that holds the door together be prepared to glue all the parts back together.
writes: | | > Have you tried using a heat gun? | | Well doors have 100+ years of lead paint etc. so probably not good to | use a heat gun. Plus, I would prefer the convenience of a dip rather | than hours and hours of hand scraping/heating/chemicals etc...
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I've done it several times, and the paint bubbles right off. I could do a door in less time than anyone here has quoted for a dipping place so far. Using the heat gun won't get it off to the point that you could stain it. I repaint them. It's really not that hard if the paint bubbles up. All the stuff you hear about lead paint is mostly BS, it's not cryptonite. Just wear a respirator and change your clothes and shower when you are done and do this in a well ventilated area. I don't use chemicals on the doors, just bubble up the paint, scrape off, then use a 1/3 sheet sander, then use some DAP plastic wood as filler for imperfections, then prime and paint. They lok great when I'm done.
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I have been using Minutman in Somerville. Good job, but be warned, they are slow. If they say 4 weeks it's more like 4 months.
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snipped-for-privacy@nobody.com wrote:

Dip stripping is really tough on wood and raises grain a great deal. You might end up doing more work sanding than if you strip the stuff yourself. Flat doors, especially. If the moldings are standard plain molding, might be better in the long run just to replace it. If shaped or good wood, another story.
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Is it tougher than using surface applied chemicals?

Door and moldings are 125 years old and definitely not standard. I had some molding knives made back a couple of years ago but did not get enough "extra" made and the company who holds the knives now wants $500 just to set up a run (the casing has two parts to it and they charge $250 per molding). So rather than pay $500+ just to get about 20 feet of molding, I was hoping to strip some of the old moldings.
By the way, to be consistent with the existing architecture, I was planning on repainting the molding (white) and staining the door to match the rest of the interior trim.
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snipped-for-privacy@nobody.com wrote:

There may be something newer than when I last saw wood that was dipped. I have done lots of paint removal with good old methylene whateveritis. When I have done chem. stripping, I never sanded. As part of the final cleanup, on antique furniture, I scrubbed with steel wool dipped in mineral spirits - I didn't want the wood to look brand new, and it didn't, but was smoothe enough to refinish. Dipped wood that I have seen had grain raised badly, very fuzzy. As someone else pointed out, it may also loosen glue joints. You might stop by a shop that does it to see for yourself.
I have also used torch method, but that was on exterior trim to be repainted. With great caution, it might be the way to take off the thickest paint, then just sand and repaint. If there is shape to the wood, the torch would probably gum up fine grooves. Might also char if too aggressive.

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wrote:

I once removed all the moldings and windows from a house and took them to a place with a chemical dip tank. I had very little scrapeing and sanding to do before staining and painting the result. They are still beautiful 30 years later.
Unfortunately, the place I went to went out of business. Probably, OSHA rules keep others from doing the same these days. I have heard that the "hot lye" method used these days has the effect you mention.
Bob
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On Feb 5, 1:51 pm, snipped-for-privacy@nobody.com wrote:

Not even close but can only suggest looking in yellow pages for "refinishing" or "restoration" kinds of places. Unfortunately, I think many of these are no longer owing to EPA and to a lesser extent OSHA regulations. In such a major metro area of the age of Boston, though, would think it highly likely the restoration business would be sufficient to find at least a few candidates. Would expect it won't be cheap, but probably worth it for unique old moulding.
Good luck...I'm always glad to hear of others who will go to the trouble to reuse and otherwise salvage old materials...
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replying to dpb, marksimon112 wrote:

Does it happened really? What are you saying man!
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