Dining room receptacles

My understanding is that Dining room receptacles are treated under NEC as kitchen area.
If so, do all receptacles in the dining room have to be on 20A dedicated circuits that feed only kitchen-type area receptacles?
Or is it enough to have at least one receptacle wired that way but others can feed non-kitchen area outlets?
Similarly, it is true that a circuit feeding a kitchen-area receptacle cannot also feed a light?
Finally, what defines a dining room? If it a separate room from the kitchen, what makes it a dining room vs. another family room or parlor?
Thanks
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blueman wrote:

cant say for sure but I do know my kitchen has all GFCi and my dining room has all non-GFCI.
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Depending on the size of the dinning room one 20 amp circuit is enough. Your supposed to have MIN 2 circuits for kitchen counters plus circuits for all fixed appliances. The counter circuits are for corded appliances nothing else.
Definitions are what is generally on the plans. Family rooms in some jurisdictions are treated like dinning rooms. Idea is to put higher amp circuits where the loads are probably going to be.
In reality no one I know ever has a lot of loads plugged in the walls in a dinning room. I like to bring this up for lively conversations at the International Electrical Inspectors Association meetings that I go to. Follow the code in your area, if you do not know call some expert and ask.
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when they were building my house, i had a small pony wall next to the dining room. they wired it up with a 20 amp circuit because people tend to use that area to put food warmers on for buffets, so it isn't unheard of.
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A dining room is usually different from a kitchen, because the kitchen has plumbing. There would be no real difference between a dining room and a family room or parlor. It's just what you call it.
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blueman wrote:

Yes, the dining room must be on a small appliance circuit.

No, all receptacle outlets in a dining room have to be on a small appliance circuit.

Correct, it's considered a small appliance circuit.
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WRT these two paragraphs... I know nothing about dining rooms, but IF it is required for such circuits to be 20amps and be treated as kitchen area, then I think you are looking at this somewhat reversed. The cart before the horse, so to speak.
The goal would be to have receptacles that meet the proper standards. If the standards for the dining room must be as strict as the standards for the kitchen, those would be the standards they have to meet.
But they don't have to be wired in the same circuit as a kitchen area outlet. There is nothing especially good about being on the same circuit as the kitchen. Although if the wiring in both rooms has to meet the same standards, there might well be times when it is *convenient* but not required to have one or more receptacle in the kitchen and one or more in the dining room on the same circuit.

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blueman ( snipped-for-privacy@nospam.com) said...

Under the CEC, there is this rule:
26-712 (d) In dwelling units there shall be installed in each kitchen: (iv) At least one duplex receptacle in a dining area forming part of a kitchen;
Rule 26-722 (e) also states that the recptacle in a dining area of a kitchen must be on its own circuit, except that it can also supply a receptacle required by rule 26-712(d)(ii), which is a receptacle to serve a gas range.
The CEC does not have a rule regarding a dining room, even if there is no dining area in the kitchen.
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The outlets in the dining room have to be on a small appliance 20 amp circuit. They can share one or more of the same small appliance circuits feeding your kitchen. You cannot install lights on these circuits. A dining room is as defined by your set of plans

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