Digitally store a key

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Locked out? This kiosk securely stores a digital copy of your key Devin Coldewey NBC News
We've all been locked out before, and it can be a huge pain to raise a locksmith at two in the morning or buzz a friend to let you into the building. But soon you may be able to walk to your local convenience store and get a new key cut just by scanning your thumb.
That's the plan of a new startup called KeyMe, which has created a Kiosk that not only duplicates keys on demand, but lets you store the key pattern digitally and associate it with your fingerprint.
So far there are five, hosted by 7-Eleven stores across Manhattan. You put your key in a keyhole, where it is analyzed. You can then have a new key cut for $3.49, or securely store your key data for later. It doesn't keep your address or name associated with the key data, just the short series of numbers that tells the machine what pattern to cut — encrypted, of course.
That way, when you realize you lent your only front door key to a friend or left it at work, you just walk to the store on the corner, put your thumb on the scanner, and cough up the $20 for a fresh key. Yes, it's a lot more than the $3.49 you'd have paid for a spare to hide under the flower pot, but it's a lot less than you might pay for a visit from the emergency locksmith.
There are other key kiosks that quickly duplicate keys, but none that let you store the pattern securely like KeyMe does. The company's founder, Greg Marsh, hopes to expand throughout New York City and then move on to the rest of the country.
http://www.nbcnews.com/technology/locked-out-kiosk-securely-stores-digital-copy-your-key-6C10459204
Being able to store/send a key digitally would seem more plausible if you could print a key with a 3D printer.
If your keys are locked in the car, you are still stuck without a way to get to a store. I am thinking as 3D printers get more affordable, you might get stuck in a place were you could get to a 3D printer. (Keys locked in the car at the hospital)
I already have a hidden house key that I have used more times than I can count. When I leave my car with a mechanic I always forget to take the house key. I even have one of those key rings that separate in two. One half for my truck and house key and the other half for my car.
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On 06-29-2013 12:45, Metspitzer wrote:

Is it cheaper than putting an electronic lock on your door? Probably so, unless you lose keys often.
<http://www.gokeyless.com/product/1510/2/
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Wes Groleau wrote:

Hi, What about battery running down on it? Is there manual over ride?
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On 6/29/2013 12:17 PM, Tony Hwang wrote:

Typically, the "manual override" is the KEY. Also, every electronic lock that I've seen has a low battery warning that gives plenty of notice that the batteries need replacement.
Ergo, one would need the "perfect storm" of a) batteries expired in the electronic lock (through the user's fault) AND b) loss of the key.
I'm kinda liking the idea of this digital key stowage though... Imagine scanning ALL of your keys using a standardized encoding program, storing them in on your smart phone or ... in securely encrypted format. You lock yourself out of your car at the shopping center, find a hardware store that has the machine and go have a new key cut on the spot. Yeah, I know it won't start the car but it will let you in to retrieve your programmed/smart key that you absentmindedly left behind.
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I have an electronic lock on the front door, a key pad for the garage and a hidden key for the back basement door. I haven't carried a house key in many years but I'm not worried about ever getting locked out.
My keychain holds nothing but an ignition key and key fob.
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Metspitzer wrote:

Hmmm, Usually, if I get locked out. I open garage door with outside digital keypad opener. Then there is a key hidden in the garage.
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wrote:

Same here. The key in the garage is also hidden, of course.
The digital idea is nifty though, as many people don't have a garage or other good hiding place. I can see it doing well in a densely copulated are with many apartments and town houses.
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On 06-29-2013 14:22, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

And most people _think_ they have a good hiding place.
But most thieves already know where the "good hiding places" are.
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I'd not want that information in a digital kiosk. Wait, it wants your home adress, too?
Densely copulated? Was that a typo? Funny, in either chase. . Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org . .
On 06-29-2013 14:22, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

And most people _think_ they have a good hiding place.
But most thieves already know where the "good hiding places" are.
--
Wes Groleau

Those who make peaceful revolution impossible
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On Sun, 30 Jun 2013 18:49:28 -0400, "Stormin Mormon"

Well, you can't have one without the other.
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Here's another solution to the "locked out" problem.
Hang a small windchime on your front porch, the cheap kind with a few different metal shapes. Replace a couple of them with a lock pick and tension bar.
Learn to pick your own lock. You'll get used to your own, it's not like you have to become expert or fast.
Unlike hiding a key, you haven't given access to just anybody who finds it. Your ex isn't going to get in and unplug your freezer while you're on vacation in July.
You haven't given access to burglars either. They don't know how to pick locks, they just kick doors in. That .1% that might know probably already own a lock pick.
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wrote:

Get caught breaking into your own house may even get you a beer with the President.
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On Sunday, June 30, 2013 6:49:28 PM UTC-4, Stormin Mormon wrote:

No, it doesn't. Learn to read.
The kiosk does not store any personal information, only your fingerprint and the key data.
I suppose if you have a criminal record, the right person with the right access could cross-reference the fingerprint and get your personal information. But, you're a criminal. Would I really want to break into your home knowing that?
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Criminals have all the good drugs and guns. And are often the target of other criminals. So, yes, that's an issue. As to the adress, I'd expect the kiosk to ask. . Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org . .
On Sunday, June 30, 2013 6:49:28 PM UTC-4, Stormin Mormon wrote:

No, it doesn't. Learn to read.
The kiosk does not store any personal information, only your fingerprint and the key data.
I suppose if you have a criminal record, the right person with the right access could cross-reference the fingerprint and get your personal information. But, you're a criminal. Would I really want to break into your home knowing that?
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On Thursday, July 4, 2013 8:39:39 AM UTC-4, Stormin Mormon wrote:

It doesn't.
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On Wed, 3 Jul 2013 08:23:25 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I know there are detective and online services that for money will get more info that just your phone number.
But is there any way yet for the average guy to run someone's fingerprints. Is there an android app for it?

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On Sunday, June 30, 2013 3:14:53 PM UTC-4, Wes Groleau wrote:

Well, I'll agree that they know where the most *common* hiding places are, which may very well be the same the ones that many people consider "good" e ven if they are not.
However, I doubt they know where the actual "good" hiding places are. The k ey to my back door is in a "good" hiding spot, but that spot is nothing th at would be considered "common" - not even close to common and not even clo se to the door for that matter.
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People should be aware that whenever you buy a new deadbolt or door lock, it will come with two keys, and the 5 digit number stamped on both keys will be the code for the key profile. You can take that 5 digit number to any locksmith that knows you, tell him what kind of key it is (Weiser, Schlage, Kwikset, Yale, etc.) and he can cut you a new key just knowing what kind of blank to use and that 5 digit profile code.
Similarily, if the locksmith has the necessary gauge, he can read the key profile code off of a key (provided the key is not too badly worn.
In my case, I've got the 5 digit profile codes for all the keys on my key chain documented and stored in a binder I keep for important information. I know that as I use my keys they will gradually wear down, and copying a worn key will only result in a new key with the same worn out profile. However, by providing the locksmith with the 5 digit key profile, he can cut you an original key in it's original condition for that lock.
Locksmiths aren't supposed to cut keys just from the 5 digit profile because anyone can read that profile code if you simply set your keys down somewhere. But, if they know you well, and they know you want that key cut for your OWN property, they will.
It's also a good idea to photocopy all of the ID and credit cards in your wallet, too. That way, if you lose your wallet or it gets stolen, you know exactly what is missing, and you can contact your financial institutions and have them freeze your accounts until you can open new accounts and get new credit cards with different account numbers.
--
nestork


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Some keys have the code. I can't remember seeing a code on Kwikset. Some Kwikky clones do have the code number stamped into the key.
One time I got a call from some folks, had lost the key to their car. We arranged for the relative back home to go to a copy shop, make a photo copy of the key and fax it. The shadow profile was enough information for me to make a working key.
In theory, a locksmith across the country can decode and phone or fax or email the information to me, also. . Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org . .
People should be aware that whenever you buy a new deadbolt or door lock, it will come with two keys, and the 5 digit number stamped on both keys will be the code for the key profile. You can take that 5 digit number to any locksmith that knows you, tell him what kind of key it is (Weiser, Schlage, Kwikset, Yale, etc.) and he can cut you a new key just knowing what kind of blank to use and that 5 digit profile code.
Similarily, if the locksmith has the necessary gauge, he can read the key profile code off of a key (provided the key is not too badly worn.
In my case, I've got the 5 digit profile codes for all the keys on my key chain documented and stored in a binder I keep for important information. I know that as I use my keys they will gradually wear down, and copying a worn key will only result in a new key with the same worn out profile. However, by providing the locksmith with the 5 digit key profile, he can cut you an original key in it's original condition for that lock.
Locksmiths aren't supposed to cut keys just from the 5 digit profile because anyone can read that profile code if you simply set your keys down somewhere. But, if they know you well, and they know you want that key cut for your OWN property, they will.
It's also a good idea to photocopy all of the ID and credit cards in your wallet, too. That way, if you lose your wallet or it gets stolen, you know exactly what is missing, and you can contact your financial institutions and have them freeze your accounts until you can open new accounts and get new credit cards with different account numbers.
--
nestork


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I'd be willing to wager a pretty hefty sum that the percentage of people that know a locksmith well enough to have a key made based on a "Hi Bob! Lost my house key. Can you make me a new one"? "Sure, Steve. What's the code?" basis is so small that the suggestion is barely worth mentioning.
It's good to know, but not practical for the vast majority of people.
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