Digital TV

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45-50 miles and in a hole, we had spent so much trying to get analog; Rotor, big fringe antenna, amplifier, best quality coax, and still results were dismal. The converter box was another story, we immediately got all the normal channels + a few from way east off the side of the antenna. if we turn it we can get many more, but they are redundant, I get the four main networks + CW & an assortment of UHF type stations, most of which are religious or Spanish, so we block them.
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wrote:

It's not the station itself,it's the antenna site,which may be far away from the studio site,and shared by some or all of the other local stations.

What irks me is that the stations LOWERED broadcast power after the initial switchover. that reduced their coverage area even more.(but saved them on their electric bill...)
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
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Metspitzer wrote:

I had very bad reception and only 3 or 4 channels, often unwatchable. With digital I now have 6 channels (without counting the -2 -3 simulcasts) and 3 or 4 more that are the same as other channels I get. I have the antenna about 20' taller than the roof and a rotator. I want to try going taller yet but I need a 2nd person and some guy line. BTW, to go 20 feet up, I'm using black pipe, not antenna mast. My biggest problem is a mountain blocking about 180 degrees of reception area. The distance to the stations I receive is about 30 to 90 miles, probably further yet are those channels that are all the same and I deleted them. The mountain plays tricks here. All 6 of those channels come in fairly good with the antenna pointed in what should be the WRONG direction for all of them. About 90 degrees off. To get a 7th channel, a very good PBS station, I have to rotate the antenna and it seems like it's hit or miss with the rotator just where it's going to work tonight.
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Percival P. Cassidy wrote:

So add aa amplifier, or jack your pc to your tv and stream shows on the internet. Why pay for cable when so many shows and movies can be viewed online for free?
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I live 50 miles northwest of New York City. My rooftop antenna system consists of a rotor, separate UHF and VHF high band antennas, connected to a CM 7777 mast mounted pre amplifier. The engineers continue to play with the antennas and power output at the Empire State Building, and reception is a very mixed bag. UHF channels are more reliable than the VHF high band channels. VHF channels are stronger in the morning on cold days with snow and ice on the ground. After a rain storm I can receive WABC channel 7 if I point my antenna towards a cell tower about one mile away. Once the tower dries out the signal dies. The most reliable signals are from WCBS, WNBC, WNYW, WWOR, and WPIX. The non English audio, infomercial, and holy roller stations on UHF come in loud and clear at all times, but I don't care for their programming. Too many of them don't know what to do with their sub channels, wasting bandwidth on poor quality 24 hour a day traffic cams, canned low cost junk programming, rebroadcasts of weather forecast audio. I used to get many of the PBS stations, until their money sources died up and they reduced their transmitter power.
Not all converter boxes have the same design receiver chip sets. Some are much better than others.
Steve
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Percival P. Cassidy wrote:

People at dbstalk have complained about the OTA capabilities of DirecTV DVR's for some time. Many claim the tuners are inferior to the ones on their HDTV sets. That hasn't been my experience. I've got a 37-year-old rooftop UHF/VHF antenna and am about 38 miles from Mount Wilson, where most of the Southern California stations are located. I get excellent pictures OTA on my main Sony Bravia HDTV set and my smaller Sceptre HDTV set. I get acceptable pictures on my old Sylvania CRT using a converter box. I can receive local channels via satellite or OTA on my DirecTV DVR. The input from my rooftop antenna is split four ways with no amplifiers.
What looked really bad was the analog signals OTA on the two HDTV sets before the digital signals took over.
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On Wed, 13 Jan 2010 10:45:34 -0500, "Percival P. Cassidy"

I have a 50" plasma theater room and use an attic antenna to pick up all three PBS channels. The attic antenna is also connected to my TV Hauppage tuner card (about $70) where I can record hi-def programs.
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wrote:

There are proposals to elminate OTA tv completely and let the broadcasters sell the banwidth or most of it for cell phones etc.
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On Wed, 13 Jan 2010 16:11:49 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@aol.com"

By Harry A. Jessell TVNewsCheck, Dec 11 2009, 4:00 PM ET
The National Association of Broadcasters is asking TV stations to join the fight to preserve broadcast spectrum by airing an NAB-produced 30-second spot touting the benefits of free, over-the-air broadcasting.*
...The broadcast industry could see the greatest assault on the public airwaves since the 1980s, with the anticipated release of the FCC's National Broadband Plan set for February 17, 2010," says the e-mail.
The NAB fears that the plan will recommend that all or some of broadcast spectrum be reallocated for wireless broadband access, a service the FCC believes will soon be facing a spectrum shortage.
http://www.tvnewscheck.com/articles/2009/12/11/daily.10 /
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On 01/13/10 07:11 pm, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

That would be crazy so soon after the broadcasters have spent large sums of money on new equipment and dumped still-working but no longer usable analog equipment.
However, my broadcast-engineer friend did say that he wonders how much longer traditional radio broadcasting is going to survive. (Perhaps we'll all have to have satellite for that too.)
Perce
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wrote:

99% of the cost is for the RF transmission and the equipment is the same.
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On 1/13/2010 20:17, AZ Nomad wrote:

They had to buy all new equipment for the digital transition. You may remember they ran their existing equipment on their old channels and then added a complete set of equipment: transmitter, waveguides, antennas, STL etc to transmit the "digital" signal while still keeping the existing equipment in service.
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[snip]

For the stations around here, most of that was their existing backup transmitter.
--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.us
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On 01/14/10 07:23 pm, Mark Lloyd wrote:

If their new frequency assignment iss close to the old one, that probably was possible. But part of the reason for getting rid of analog broadcasting was to free up the low VHF channels. Our old Ch. 3 still appears as Ch. 3 because the TV figures out the translation, but it's actually on Ch. 8. Our old Ch. 13 is now -- IIRC -- on Ch. 39. Major equipment replacement needed.
Perce
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On Thu, 14 Jan 2010 20:02:59 -0500, "Percival P. Cassidy"

Here there were no stations on VHF Lo (2-6), 1 on VHF Hi (7-13), and the rest on UHF. They all stayed in the same band after conversion. Channel 7 (ABC) used 10 for digital, and changed back to 7 after the analog was turned off.
--
Mark Lloyd
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wrote:

The biggest expense was not the switch to digital, but the move to a new frequency. TV transmitters are built to operate on a single frequency. To switch channels, you have to replace it.
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On 1/14/2010 20:07, AZ Nomad wrote:

Right, that is why pretty much all of them had to go out and buy a complete set of additional hardware (transmitter, waveguide, antenna) to transition to digital
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On Thu, 14 Jan 2010 19:07:13 -0600, AZ Nomad
[snip]

That doesn't sound right, especially if the change in frequency as small. Shouldn't it be something like the crystals used in old CB radios?
--
Mark Lloyd
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wrote:

Next time you're running a 4 watt tv station, that might be valid.
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On Fri, 15 Jan 2010 17:33:53 -0600, AZ Nomad

If you don't actually know why equipment needs to be replaced, you could say so. Maybe you just don't want to admit not knowing.
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