Digging a Very Narow Trench For Burying Coax Wire ?

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and btw, i agree with snipped-for-privacy@aol.com about putting the cable inside plastic conduit, plastic water line, etc.
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replying to bill allemann, Jeff wrote: There's a tool called a Hitch-N-Ditch that might work if you have a truck or tractor.
http://www.hitch-n-ditch.com /
Here's a Youtube video of it in action.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VrTGoKb3Bu4

While we are on Youtube, there's also this guy who made a hand tool for short distances and he also has a "tractor" with a similar trenching tool on it..
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FYqghiI-ryQ

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On Wed, 07 Sep 2016 12:14:01 +0000, Jeff wrote:

In the *TEN YEARS* since bill allemann made that post, you could have dug the trench with a plastic spork from KFC.
Why don't you HomeOwnersNoobs ever read the dates to what you are replying?
--
Sam

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I suggest using a plastic SPORK from KFC.
I know someone stole my idea.
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On Wednesday, September 7, 2016 at 10:45:29 AM UTC-4, Thomas wrote:

Does KFC use special SPORKs or will a generic SPORK work?
Actually, a *metal* SPORK would be better. Even better...you can pop open your favorite beverage with a SCORK.
http://www.gofastandlight.com/images/scork_large.jpg
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I'm doing some trenching right now, and I am using my Mantis tiller to do the work. It is excellent for the job. I am going much deeper than you are because I am putting in electrical cable and phone lines inside conduit. Your task should go quickly.
Basically, I run the Mantis tiller back and forth along the path of the trench, and then the dirt is loose enough to shovel out easily. The Mantis breaks up the roots and tosses out the rocks, etc. The shovelling is easy, then. To go deeper, I simply put the tiller back in the shovelled-out trench and break up the dirt down deeper, then shovel that out and repeat, until I get deep enough.
Make sure that you shovel the dirt onto a tarp or something. If you just shovel it onto the grass by the trench, it is much harder to get the dirt back into the trench after putting in the wire because so much of it is mixed in with the grass.
+++
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On Sat, 21 Jan 2006 07:48:55 -0500, Robert11 wrote:

I don't think you even need to go that far down (for a receiving antenna particularly).

The cable company has a tool that essentially slits the turf slides the cable under the turf. It's maybe 3" down. This is a heavy frost zone too (north-west Vermont). It seems to work fine and there's no damage to the lawn.

I think your slave labor idea was a good one. ;-)
--
Keith

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wrote:

Spirint uses a screwdriver here. They barely part the sod and shove their flooded line in right under the thatch. I don't recomend it but they swear it works fine. The cable company uses a wide "edger" looking tool. A flat blade on a handle. One guy chops a slit and holds the sod back while the other guy shoves the cable in. They go pretty fast.
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wrote:

The cable tv company has a little vibrator thingy that works while the guy stands up. It wiggles a blade, I think, and cuts a slit and puts the wire in the slit at the same time. When he was done, I forget if he had to walk on it once, but it looked good as new when he was done.
It might have been gas powered since he does it all day. I don't think it was electric and it certainly wasn't manual. And I'm sure the wire wasn't more than 3 inches below the surface, maybe less.
I don't know if rental places have these or not, but for only 40 feet with a kid some of the other ideas for slitting the ground sound good enough.
Kids should do hard work between 12 or 13 and 29. It is so much easier to build muscles then. The smarter they are or the more likely they are to get a white collar job, the more they should do hard work, at least some times, when they are that age, because the less likely they are to do hard work at work, and they often even get white collar summer jobs once they are in college.

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Don't bury it 6 inches deep because two years from now you will have to do it all over again. The cable guys don't care how long it lasts because they get paid to fix it. A Ditchwich is what you need. Rent one and cut a trench at least a foot deep (or hire some local yokels to do it for $80). Put in a 1" PVC conduit with a pull string. Run two RG6 coax and a couple of CAT-6 lines.
Robert11 wrote:

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Tim Killian wrote:

To a receiving antenna? Why the overkill?
R
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wrote:

Someday you may want to put in a (ethernet) camera to watch people trying to steal your antenna.
Or maybe just an extra pull string, for later additions.
--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.laughingsquid.com
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On Sat, 21 Jan 2006 13:11:17 -0700, Tim Killian

The cable guys don't care because it's just a job, and they do what they're told. But the cable company cares, and doesn't want to be redoing work over and over, so if that's what happened next, the cable company wouldn't do it this way.
My cable went in 22 years ago, but I stopped using cable about 12 years ago. All I can say is that everything was fine for the first 10 years, and it comes from a box about 90 feet away.

And how long before the yard looks decent again? How long before the depression, or bump, goes away?
It took the cable guy (one guy) about 10 or 15 minutes to install the line, iirc. No more than a half hour.
. Put in a 1" PVC conduit with a pull string. Run two RG6

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On Sat, 21 Jan 2006 20:54:18 -0500, mm wrote:

The cable won't last longer if it's 10 feet deep. It just needs to be out of the way of the lawn mower. It's a lot cheaper to slit it under the sod than to dig a deep trench and fix the grass.

Mine went in 20 years ago when the house was new. About five years ago they had to replace the line when I went to Internet cable and digital TV. THe lead in was fine for analog TV but too much loss for the bits.

I didn't even notice when they did mine. They had to lay the cable on the ground because it was frozen harder than a rock. In the spring I called to see when they'd bury it. They already had. <blush>

Do you drive an Abrahms too? ;-)
--
Keith

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Why so deep? Just under the turf is usually adequate for coax installations.
You can rent a machine made specifically for the purpose.
http://www.18inch.com/ Click on "Rental Items". Our local rental yards have similar machines, and they are not as big and destructive as using a "ditch-witch". They are also much cheaper to rent.
jim menning
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http://rermag.com/mag/equipment_vibratory_plows_find /
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Be aware that not all coaxial cables are suitable for burying. Buriable cables are a special category and probably much more expensive.
I think you should consider running the cable in conduit if you can't get buriable cable.
Perce
On 01/21/06 07:48 am Robert11 wrote:

<snip>
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