Digging a Very Narow Trench For Burying Coax Wire ?

Page 1 of 2  
Hi,
Have to run about 40 feet or so of coax wire to a receiving antenna in my backyard.
Wish to bury it, probably not more than a foot to two feet deep should do it.
Other than using a square tipped shovel (or forcing my kid to do it), was wondering if anyone has any "clever" ideas on other possible ways of digging this very narrow (slit type) of trench ?
Getting on inyears now, and it sounds like a lot of work. Is there some tool other than the shovel that I might rent, or... ?
Thanks, B.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Ditch Witch trencher. You can go down a few feet with them. There are codes for electrical wires, but coax may not have to be so deep as it is not current carrying.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
maybe a pressure washer or shop vac, depending on your soil. rent a trencher and run some water pipe also deep enough below frost line and some electrical conduit too.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
buffalobill wrote:

"Below the frost line?" Who cares if coax freezes?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
-snip-

I was using a modified hoe last summer [ground the blade to about 3" wide] -- then I found what looks like a long-handled adze at a flea market. It was old and I'll need to build a new handle for it soon, but it works for this old back. Mine has two 2 1/2"wide blades, one for digging, and the other for chopping. In my root filled soil that works well. The handle on mine is about 5 feet long, so I don't have to work all hunched over.
I have no idea what it was used for originally, but it makes a fine trencher. OTOH-- If a Ditch Witch is in your budget- it will make short work of a trench and not tear up the landscape too badly. Jim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I have a #407 in this picture. http://www.made-in-china.com/showimages/111/100005806/0/Pick_ (P402,P406).jpg It works good on roots.
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That's exactly what i remebered--- but here's the actual tool;
http://home.nycap.rr.com/elbrecht/adze4.jpg
[note that my memory betrayed me. The second blade is just smaller, but on the same plane as the other.]
The whole thing weighs less than 3 pounds, and the handle is as long as, and straight and round like a hoe-handle. But it has a round flare so a hoe handle won't work as a replacement.
In the past 30 years I've spent many days looking at old tools at antique auctions, flea markets and garage sales and don't recall ever seeing another quite like this.
Jim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I've had one like that for 40 years. When my dad passed, I gave the one he had to my son.
wrote:

g
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

-snip-
So what do you call it? IMO- Adze implies a woodworking tool. . . I've always thought of a maddock as a heavier tool. It isn't quite a hoe. . . .
Jim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jim Elbrecht wrote:

That's a mattock, not an adze. An adze would have either a single sharp cutter on one side, a single cutter with a hammer face on the other, or a single cutter with a pin hammer (not sure of the terminology) on the other for setting spikes in boat building.
We think of an adze as giving a pretty rough finish, but the Spartans didn't use adzes as they thought the finish was too smooth and effeminate. Maybe that's why they had marble toilet seats. ;)
R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
the picture shows a mattock (mentioned a few times in the Old Testament). if the small blade is rotated 90, it's an adze. both are sold at Home Depot.
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You have a mattok which is used to for exactlly the purpuse for which you are using it, digging and trenching. The verticle blade is for chopping through roots. There are versions that have a more traditional pick head instead of the chopping blade.
You should be able to find a replacment handle in the garden section of any home store, its the same as used for picks.
http://members.aol.com/dargolyt/TheForge/mattock.htm
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 21 Jan 2006 14:46:43 GMT, "Cliff Hartle"

The one I have only weighs just 2.5 pounds- handle and all. The handle is the same diameter [and length] as a sturdy hoe. The business end of the handle is a round flare. My clay pick takes the standard pick handle- but that is too short and heavy to do much trenching.
A picture is worth a thousand words. Here's a collage of the tool I have;
http://home.nycap.rr.com/elbrecht/adze4.jpg
[note that my memory betrayed me. The second blade is just smaller, but on the same plane as the other.]
Jim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I doubt if you have to go down that far for coax cable. If you do, rent a Ditch-Witch or similar brand at your local rental place. If you don't have to go down too far, see if you can rent an invisible fence trencher. http://www.dogfencetrencher.com /

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Several people in our area have used gasoline powered Sidewalk Edgers to dig a thin trench as deep as it will go then pushed telephone lines down into the trench with thin board. Just loaned our Edger to a friend and he did this. I would not do that as I do not believe you can get deep enough.
Walt Conner
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I used to be a dish dealer, and assume you need the coax run for a satellite install. in any case it really doesnt matter.
DONT DIRECT BURY THE CABLE! If it ever fails you have all that digging again:(
Dig a really shallow trench like 6 inches deep, that makes the jb instantly easier:)
Then run roll of plastic pipe in ditch, then pull coax thru pipe / conduit.
use a oversize conduit, things change and one day you might need another cable in there
backfill the hole. since its conduit the line can be shallow and wouldnt get damaged accidently:)
This is how we handled all installs requiring digging.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Our satellite guy used a post hole digger.
amy
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I had some cable I buried where I used to live. I got tired of repeated digging to repair it (I think the cable damage was from some animal chewing on it).

Replacing the cable should be easy, using the old cable (it it's not completely broken) to pull the new cable throught.
--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.laughingsquid.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
As several have said, a few inches down is probably enough. Comcast here in the Chicago area only goes down about 4" for the drop from the pedestal to the house. I've used a sod lifter with the blade perpendicular to the ground to make a slot. An "ice scraper," that's what they are called in the frozen north, should also work. Once the slot is made, the tool is rocked back and forth to make a V groove. The cable can be pushed into the V. I used a hand held weeding tool with a V in the end to push the cable to the slot in the each. You have to be careful not to push too hard and damage the cable. A wooden piece of 1 x 1 would probably work well. Once the cable is in, step the 2 sides of the V groove together. In not time, the vegetation will disappear the slot.
WConner wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I buried a cable in a friends yard last year, and just used a trenching shovel (the narrowest one possible). One advantage to this over machinery, is that you can peel the sod off and put it aside, dig 5 or 6 feet of trench, saving the dirt in a wheelbarrow, lay in your cable for that segment of trench, rebury, put the sod back, etc, repeat until you're there. The trench was about 45' and the whole thing took 4 hours. The best part was with the sod going right back, and the dirt never piled in the grass, you could tell it ever happened. An electrical contractor bid this at $1100 with a ditchwitch, and the lawn would have been a disaster.
bill

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.