Difference between P225x75R15 and P235x75R15 on SUV

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I'm on Tire Rack and need to make a choice to help a friend. What's the *practical* difference of 10mm wider tread?
1. This SUV is a dozen years old & has never been off road 2. This SUV is used like a car & never carries a heavy load 3. What matters to the owner is economy & safety
From the standpoint of economy (e.g., miles per tire), I don't know if a 10mm wider tire will last longer or shorter. Do you?
From safety, I "guess" that 10mm more of tread width is safer, but the driver is a little old lady (literally) in a no-snow state, so, traction isn't really a problem.
Any idea what's best?
Stock OEM is 225x75R15 Current tires are 235x75R15 but I'm replacing all four.
What difference (practically) does 10mm make?
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On Sunday, June 19, 2016 at 6:44:33 PM UTC-5, Henning Schröder wrote:

This is your 1st post...are you a nymshifter?
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bob_villain auf Sun, 19 Jun 2016 16:52:17 -0700 geschrieben ...

I have plenty of posts, just not to this newsgroup because I don't ask questions about buying parts.
I'm all over the mobile device newsgroups, for example. And, even if I were a "nym shifter", the question is a perfectly valid question.
Do you have a problem with the question?
Or are you just a paranoid Internet Nazi with hugely misplaced Draconian ideas that have no absolutely basis in reality?
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Henning Schröder wrote:

225 & 235 are section widths, not tread width. Try to keep the tread width about the same as the wheel width. Measure the wheel bead to bead width then look up tables that list acceptable section widths for that wheel. Or, ask the tire place.
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Wouldn't changing require different wheels? Why not go with the size you already have?
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That's not enough of a difference in width to require different wheels.
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On Sun, 19 Jun 2016 19:14:48 -0500, Chet Kincaid

unless there is a clearance problem, a 235 will fit the same wheel as the 225. Only 10mm width difference, and 7.5mm diameter - or3.75mm standing height. I have 235 winter tires and 225 summer tires on my pickup
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On 06/19/2016 06:14 PM, Chet Kincaid wrote:

No.

Some sizes are more readily available or cheaper.
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On 6/19/2016 8:53 PM, rbowman wrote:

Isn't anyone going to ask?
Does SIZE really matter?
--
Maggie

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We are talking tires, right?
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Chet Kincaid auf Sun, 19 Jun 2016 19:14:48 -0500 geschrieben ...

It's only a few millimeters. The wheels are the same for both widths.
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Henning Schröder wrote:

For this use, None. The only thing that would be different is that the 235 tire is about 1/2 inch in diameter larger. The speedometer will read slower than actual speed.
Specification Sidewall Radius Diameter Circumference Difference
225/75-15 6.6in 14.1in 28.3in 88.9in 0%
235/75-15 6.9in 14.4in 28.9in 90.7in 2.1%
--
Steve W.

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Steve W. auf Sun, 19 Jun 2016 20:44:05 -0400 geschrieben ...

Are you sure about the half inch diameter difference? Someone else calculated 7.5mm diameter - or3.75mm in ride height.
There are 25.4 mm in an inch, so half an inch would be more than a dozen millimeters, which isn't what the other guy said on diameter.
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On Mon, 20 Jun 2016 02:33:36 -0000 (UTC), Henning Schröder

a basic understanding of tire numbering The 225 or 235 is the tire section width in mm. the 75 (or 70, or 60, or 55) is the aspect ratio - the decimal fraction of the section width that represents the tire hieght.
I DID make an error - the sidewall hight changes by 7.5 mm - so the diameter changes by 15mm - pretty close to 0 .6 inch.
My bad.
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clare auf Sun, 19 Jun 2016 22:56:46 -0400 geschrieben ...

How it tire section different than tread width? Someone said they're different. I never used the term "tire section", but, I always thought the 225 or 235 was the width of the tire on the road, which, to me, is the tread width.
Is there a difference between tread width and tire section?

Thanks for confirming the strange math where the height of the tire is listed as an inch percentage of the mm "tire section" width.
So the ride height is a bit more than half an inch difference. That's small (unless the spare is being used, where the spare is the larger width).
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On 06/19/2016 09:08 PM, Henning Schröder wrote:

Not noticeable. It's a long story but I run 14" studded tires in the winter, 15" street tires in the summer. The ride height is different and the speedometer is off by about 10% but there are no other problems. I use the GPS speed rather than the speedometer and that is correct.
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wrote:

My truck came with 14 inch rims - I ran 15 inch snows for a few years -with 16 inch summers (on mags) Then I put oversized brakes on and the 15 inch snows didn't fit any more - so new 16 inch rims and snows. I had to replace the speedo gear in the trans - otherwise no problems.
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Henning Schröder wrote:

Google. Internet. http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tiretech/techpage.jsp?techid 0
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Henning Schröder wrote:

Yes. The section width is measured from sidewall to sidewall. Depending on design and application the tread with itself will be different.

--
Steve W.

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On Mon, 20 Jun 2016 03:08:38 -0000 (UTC), Henning Schröder

The tire section width is OFTEN the same as the tread width, but not necessarily. Some tires have narrower tread than section width
A tire's section width (also called "cross section width") is the measurement of the tire's width from its inner sidewall to its outer sidewall (excluding any protective ribs, decorations or raised letters) at the widest point. This measurement is made without any load placed upon the tire and after the tire has been properly mounted on its industry assigned measuring rim and has been inflated and reset to its test pressure after 24 hours.
Because a tire's section width is influenced by the width of the rim upon which the tire is mounted, the correct industry assigned measuring rim width for the tire size being measured must be used.
The width of a tire mounted on a narrow rim would be "narrower" than if the same tire was mounted on a wide rim.

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