diesel fuel in a home fuel oil furnace?

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Meat Plow wrote: ...

"Dirty" in what sense? It'll be far lower in S than fuel oil, certainly, owing to the EPA reg's on motor fuels that don't apply to heating fuel. Depending on grade of fuel oil, could be quite a lot cleaner-burning, actually...
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On Sat, 02 Feb 2008 12:51:11 -0600, dpb wrote:

I never got a chance to analyze either in a lab. Blame Trane for my answer.
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Meat Plow wrote: ...

I'm having a hard time figuring what their answer would be based on, specifically...granted, the engine-fuel additives are way overkill for a boiler burner, but in general the detergents and so on would help clean burner tips as they do injectors, the EPA requirements on S, etc., are designed for reducing emissions, etc. That they would undoubtedly be more effective in a higher performance application I agree, but still can't see it being of any significant difference--just extra $$ up the flue, in general...
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Then you need to get a mind of your own and stop parroting. Way too much of that around here lately and much of it is misinformation.
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Not quite. Now the other way around (using #2 heating oil in a diesel car) might be too dirty.
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Correct. That was my point too.
Back when I did service work, if you were our cutomer and you ran out during the middle of the night, *I* would show up with two 5 gallon cans of either deisel or K1 (kerosene).......
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I can totally believe that. One friend of mine moved into a trailer, and doesn't yet know how to check the gages. Ran out of propane on Saturday, and called for fuel. The truck got there Thursday. She got to live in one room with electric heater those couple days.
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responding to http://www.homeownershub.com/maintenance/diesel-fuel-in-a-home-fuel-oil-furnace-285510-.htm ronyaker wrote:
lp13-30 wrote:

------------------------------------- you can sidestep the taxes by buying off-road diesel. same as no. 2 diesel i'm told (has the same red dye) but no sales tax. today i got 100 gallons at $2.599, compared to 3.099 for road fuel (no dye). i did this after i called local fuel distributor who was charging 2.799 a gallon, plus sales tax (came to 305, or almost the same as road-priced fuel). in other words, the delivery guy hits you for about 40cents per gallon as a delivery fee. i use two 55-gallon drums which i got for free from a jiffy-lube shop, strapped to a 6x10 trailer. i use a manual-crank pump which i got for about $35 at harbor freight. it helps that i live close to a rural township with farmers around who need this for their tractors and such. may be harder to find in more-urban areas. final result: $50 savings plus/minus, for about an hour's effort.
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responding to http://www.homeownershub.com/maintenance/diesel-fuel-in-a-home-fuel-oil-furnace-285510-.htm ronyaker wrote:
Joseph Meehan wrote:

-------------------------------------
offroad diesel is about 55 cents cheaper than road fuel in my state, also doesn't pick up sales tax or delivery surcharge that the oil guys hits you with. i d.i.y. mine for about $50 savings per 100 gallons, takes about an hour, 2 55-gal drums and a handcrank pump.
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Yes, or K-1 (kerosene).
I know. You aren't on automatic delivery and if you run out, what do you do? Keep a couple of 5 gallon cans around...
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"Dr. Hardcrab" wrote:

Yes, essentially the only differences between the #2 heating oil in your tank and the #2 diesel at the pump are the transportation fuel taxes you pay at the pump and the red dye they put in the non taxed heating oil. Otherwise they are interchangeable functionally, and the heating oil is also known as "off road diesel" since it's legal to use in off road equipment.
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That is not entirely correct. I was checking out the use of furnace fuel oil to power my standby generator. I contacted a number of major oil companies and got some surprising answers. Apparently, in some small markets, fuel oil and diesel are identical, but sometimes and in high demand areas they are different. They both use the same base stock but diesel is required to have a certain quality and "cetane" level (equivalent to octane in gasoline) to prevent damage to engines, furnace oil does not and (these are my own words because they would not come out and admit it) since it only burns oil, they can ship any old shit they have around that fits the basic specifications for furnace oil --- this stuff they warned not to use in engines.
So there is a reason other than taxes, that diesel is more expensive than fuel oil. You can use diesel fuel in a furnace, as it is the good stuff, but don't use fuel oil in your engine, because it may damage the engine if they are shipping the junk oil.
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Pete C. wrote:

It is a little more complicated than that. Diesel fuel typically is sold as "diesel fuel" not a particular # oil. If the diesel fuel is sold in a freezing climate a certain percentage of #1 is mixed in to minimize fuel gelling effects.
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People who have outdoor fuel oil tanks have the same jelling problems as vehicles, I would assume that winter heating oil in cold climates is "adjusted" similarly to vehicle fuel. In this area #1 heating oil is thin, probably mostly kerosene and used in "heaters" that don't pump the oil into the combustion chamber, #2 heating oil is thicker and used in fuel oil burners. Diesel oil is rated as #2 diesel for use in engines and #1 version of diesel oil is jet fuel grade.
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EXT wrote:

I think you may be mixing a few terms. "Diesel oil" is a product that varies according to climate and isn't a specific oil # grade. #1 is kerosene by definition. Jet fuel isn't diesel. In the case of commonly used Jet A it is a very clear higher purity version of kerosene. Antimicrobial and other agents are typically added during fueling.
At least around here they don't miz oils used for heating purposes. If someone has an outside tank they will deliver #1 unless you specifically tell them otherwise. If you have an underground or inside tank they will deliver #2 unless you tell them otherwise. There are also other heavier grades of fuel oil that are commonly used but they aren't used to heat homes.
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At the refinery, there's rather more than that - I had a summer job at a refinery testing the raw feeds straight off the distillation and cracker units. At the one I worked, they had "heavy" and "light", in diesel, kerosene, naptha and gasoline - and there was some considerable crossover and confusion about nomenclature (the specs are what matter not what they call it) especially at the gasoline end.
The light and heavy kerosenes/diesels/napthas were pretty consistent straight off the units and were mixed in relatively fixed proportions to make each of the desired final products with their own naming conventions (#1 diesel etc).
The light and heavy gasolines were all over the map (some lights were so light they'd boil in your hand from skin temperature alone), and the results of mixing had to be tightly monitored to attain the proper properties. Then of course there's all the stuff about octane ratings...
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wrote:

In addition, the sulphur content in home heating oil is significantly higher than that of on-road diesel -- upwards of 5,000 ppm, whereas ULSD is limited to 15 ppm or less. Marine diesel, or what is commonly known as "Bunker C", is the dirtiest of all; it can reach as high as 45,000 ppm! [Something to think about when you book your next holiday cruise.]
Cheers, Paul
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As I recall, Bunker C is also considerably heavier than regular diesel fuel. Even at only modest temperatures, it has to be preheated to get it to flow.
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Chris Lewis,

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On Tue, 05 Feb 2008 21:03:10 -0000, snipped-for-privacy@nortelnetworks.com (Chris Lewis) wrote:

I've never laid eyes on the stuff myself, but its been described to me as the scrapings from the bottom of the barrel.... with a viscosity not unlike that of asphalt. ;-)
Cheers, Paul
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We used to burn it where I worked years ago. It had to be delivered hot (IIRC, about 125) in order to drain from the tanker truck. We'd start the boilers on #2 oil and a steam probe from the boiler into an intermediate tank heated it to a pumpable oil. Another pump circulated that back into the 10,000 gallon #6 tank to keep it warm. More difficult to burn, it was much cheaper to buy and has a higher Btu per gallon compared to #2.
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