diesel fuel in a home fuel oil furnace?

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can i use diesel fuel in a home fuel oil furnace? if so wich diesel can i use?
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Yes, but it's generally more expensive account of the road fuel taxes. #2 should work fine.
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Why, it will cost more. ULSD would be the product to use, but why pay road taxes when you can buy heating oil for less? Some diesel owners buy heating oil just to avoid the road tax and risk some hefty fines if they are found out.
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Right now Diesel is about $3.249 at the pump. Several people have posted in here in the last few days about heating oil being almost exactly the same price, so it looks like there would be no benefit in using Diesel in a heating system, or heating oil in a Diesel vehicle, from a cost standpoint. Larry
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lp13-30 wrote:

Fuel oil is always cheaper than diesel because it is not taxed.
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responding to http://www.homeownershub.com/maintenance/diesel-fuel-in-a-home-fuel-oil-furnace-285510-.htm nerys wrote: Around here (Egg Harbor Nj)
Home Heating oil is $2.90 a gallon 100 gallon minimum plus delivery charge.
Diesel right down the street is $2.95
Off Road Diesel 1 mile down the road is $2.70 Diesel at same station $2.88
Wanna guess which I use in my heater? yes I have 2 5 gallon gas cans just for filling my tank.
here diesel has 64 cents of road tax added to it per gallon.
I want some heating oil company to explain to me why their oil is not 64 cents cheaper than diesel when they are precisely the same thing.
I would also love to know why those gas stations are allowed to rape you for off road diesel as THAT ALSO should be 64 cents cheaper than the price of diesel.
Grrr makes me so mad
=?ISO-8859-1?Q?"Blattus_Slaf wrote:

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nerys wrote:

http://www.homeownershub.com/maintenance/diesel-fuel-in-a-home-fuel-oil-furnace-285510-.htm

I'm pretty sure that here in Taxachusetts there's some kind of flourescent dye added to heating oil which can be spotted when a diesel road vehicle is inspected if the owners have been "cheating" the tax man by running it on heating oil..
Jeff
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jeff_wisnia wrote:

Not fluorescent, just red dye and it's the same across the US. Heating oil / off-road diesel gets red dye to indicate it is not taxed and not allowed to be used in on-road vehicles, and on-road diesel is taxed and has no dye (clear to yellow). Other than the tax and dye, they are essentially both #2 diesel fuel, and the formula on both is adjusted in the winter in colder areas to reduce gelling.
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On 11/1/2010 8:10 PM, jeff_wisnia wrote:

Yes, any offroad (untaxed) diesel fuel is dyed red.
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Steve Barker
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On 11/1/2010 3:51 PM, nerys wrote:

http://www.homeownershub.com/maintenance/diesel-fuel-in-a-home-fuel-oil-furnace-285510-.htm
That "store bought" fuel may not wanna flow when it's 20 below. Heating oil is straight #1 diesel. You won't find that at the pump. And the mix you do find at the pump will not burn as hot and may cost you by using more and causing excessive build ups in the furnace.
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Steve Barker wrote:

Heating oil is #2 diesel, not #1 (Kerosene). I have 34 years of experience with oil heat to confirm that.

Yes, actually you will. Kerosene #1 pumps are relatively common.

Sorry, you are entirely incorrect. #2 fuel oil and #2 diesel are exactly the same other than the red dye and taxes, #1 kerosene is always the same and has a little less BTU content per gal then #2, but that's about it. None of them will cause any sort of buildup any different than your normal heating oil.
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Actually, you are wrong, in some areas. I contacted a number of oil companies regarding using home heating oil in a standby generator. The answers that I got back was that in some areas where they don't have enough volume to justify separate products they use standard diesel fuel for both. In other areas where there is a large demand for both products, they are different products. Diesel fuel for engines has higher standards and specifications to meet, especially in the cetane rating (Similar to octane rating in gasoline) as the engine must be protected for long life. In these areas the heating oil is a low grade product as it is only intended to burn in a furnace, so they will sell you some poor quality crap that is not as refined. So diesel will be fine for your furnace, but heating oil may damage your engine. Red dye is added to heating oil and to off-road diesel for use in farm tractors and/or construction equipment, and this is what I ordered for my standby generator.
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On 11/2/2010 2:47 PM, EXT wrote:

i WASN'T going to try to explain it to him. after all, he does have twenty seven some years experience jockeying fuel around. (like that makes him an expert).
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Steve Barker wrote:

Please note exactly where in the US the home heating oil is normally something other than #2. I lived 34 Years in CT where oil heat is the norm and every area supplier supplied #2 that was the same as the on-road #2 other than taxes and dye. Only big commercial buildings used lower grade fuel and those have other grade numbers like #4.
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EXT wrote:

I'm not sure where those areas may be. I lived in CT where oil heat is the norm for 34 years and all the area suppliers supplied #2 that was the same as the on-road #2 other than the taxes and dye. Certainly more than enough demand there for separate products is there were such a thing. Now some big commercial buildings did use lower grades of fuel, but those also have other grade numbers, i.e. #4, not #2.
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On 11/2/2010 7:21 AM, Pete C. wrote:

Actually they haven't been since sometime in the 1990s when low sulfur diesel (500ppm) was mandated. Then about 3 years ago ULSD (15ppm sulfur) was mandated for on road diesel fuel. My buddy has a liquid fuels business and they try to dedicate one truck for hauling it because if you haul say #2 heating oil the residual can be enough to raise the sulfur content beyond the ULSD spec.
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lp13-30 wrote:

Little or no financial benefit as far as cost per gallon, but for folks not on automatic delivery who aren't paying attention and let their heating tank run dry, it's much cheaper to take two 5gal cans to the gas station and use that to keep the furnace running until getting a normal delivery the next day vs. an emergency delivery.
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on 2/2/2008 11:26 AM Pete C. said the following:

I have 2 - 5 gallon cans of kerosene. My local hardware store carries kerosene. I average about 4 gallons a day in the winter, so that will cover a couple of days. I usually run out on a Sunday or a holiday. :-).
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Bill
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Kerosene is the general equivalent of #1 fuel oil, also. I use the #1 from my furnace all the time to run my Reddy heater.
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On Sat, 02 Feb 2008 16:26:56 +0000, Pete C. wrote:

Diesel is too 'dirty' to use in a furnace.
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