Did Rain-x ruin my windshield or is it normal (how to make it better)?

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No, not jewelers rouge, but that would also provide a large surface area.
Kaolin, typically, may be used.
The material I bought was packaged in sealed foil envelopes, but I dont remember the brand name.
You may also remember the old BonAmi product which was of a very low order of abrasiveness. It was ground feldspar, IIRC.
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on 10/7/2007 3:18 PM hls said the following:

It's still around. http://www.bonami.com /
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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Slacker wrote:

Not sure why you keep repeating this. You don't know if it is Rain-X and you are treating the clerk at the big box stores opinion as gospel.
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George wrote:

He just want's to bash Rain-X apparently, and keeps repeating it because he knows most people know he's full of it, especially given his initial admission that he has no idea what is actually on his windshield if indeed he is actually old enough to have something with a real windshield at all. Were he mature and responsible he would not persist in blaming a product he has no knowledge of and no proof is at all involved in his problem.
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In my experience, what you describe as a "haze" is simply the remaining water on the windshield broken into much smaller droplets than normally are deposited by the rain. It happens with a cold windshield, and is more like the misting from morning dew, but much finer. A single wipe from the wipers will remove it. Once the windshield is warmed by the defroster, it goes away.
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wrote:

I wouldn't use rainx on the mirrors, because they don't fog up and they don't get wet normally, but maybe someone does.
I used rainx once and I like it. In a mild rain you don't have to turn on the wipers, because the rain is flat and you can look right through it.
But it needed reapplication in less than 3 or 6 months and that was too much effort for me since the car came with windshield wipers.
If the wipers were broken, it would be a tremendous asset until you got them fixed.
I'd be surprised if somone put rainx on and it lasted longer than 6 months, but maybe they put on more than one coat.
When mine wore off, I noticed no patches, but maybe I konw how to; put it on evenly.
I don't know what adsorb means, but I'm pretty sure you can remove the stuff, or the patches will get bigger until it's all patch, like impetigo.
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On Mon, 08 Oct 2007 07:59:04 -0400, mm wrote:

aBsorb === to take up or receive by chemical or molecular action
aDsorb === to gather (a gas, liquid, or dissolved substance) on a surface in a condensed layer: Charcoal will adsorb gases.
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Slacker wrote:

Could it be car wax? ISTR a similar problem with a van at work. Wiped the glass down with denatured alcohol to remove the film.
PB
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