Did I ruin my pipe cleaner?


I made the dumb mistake of thinking I could use a copper pipe cleaning tool to clean up some galvanized that I was working on. Little did I realize how futile that was until it was too late.
Anyway, time has passed and now I've got it in my head to teach myself how to solder copper pipes - now that copper has dropped in price. so I'm looking at my pipe cleaner and wondering if it's even worth it to try to clean it up and use it to prep copper pipes.
Is the thing basically ruined now that I've got the bristles all rusty and bent? I can clean it up of course, but would it still be basically useless for cleaning copper pipes? It's not like it cost an arm and leg in the first place, but I'd rather not buy again if I don't have to.
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On Wed, 21 Feb 2007 17:38:57 -0800, "Eigenvector"

Try it on copper; would be my choice. I have some old ones that I still keep. Now if they were only made with stainless bristles.....
-- Oren
"My doctor says I have a malformed public-duty gland and a natural deficiency in moral fiber, and that I am therefore excused from saving Universes."
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You will just have to try it and see. If the copper cleans up and you don't leave any oil on the copper you are in good shape. If the copper does not end up shiney then you need a new cleaner.
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On Thu, 22 Feb 2007 04:47:34 GMT, "Ralph Mowery"

My back-up is Emery Cloth. I won't have to run out an buy a pipe cleaner. In a real pinch sandpaper.
-- Oren
"My doctor says I have a malformed public-duty gland and a natural deficiency in moral fiber, and that I am therefore excused from saving Universes."
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I use just about anything that will clean the copper if I need to. Have used the emery cloth and some of the Scotchbright pads. Anything to get the oxide off the copper and make it very shiney. Just one small spot of oxide can spoil the joint. The solder just will not stick to the oxide very well if at all.
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More frequently if you abuse them. Hint; the better ones are worth it.
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all the rust and deposits off the bristles if the things are considered consumable anyway.
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Just throw it away and buy a big box of steel wool. Nothing works better or cheaper. A selection of the fancy tools is nice to have as backup for odd ball situations, though.
HTH
Joe
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Take this from someone that can comfortably solder copper pipes in any position...Discover Copper-Bond
And get rid of the little sticks they provide and use Q-Tips with the cotton part cut off.

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I'd buy a new brush. they are about two bucks at HD, and worth every penny if it saves you a leaky fitting. Or several leaky fittings.
--

Christopher A. Young
You can\'t shout down a troll.
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