did I damage AVR (honda generator) ?

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Their GX line is indeed their commercial grade engine. The GC is the dispose-a-motor. That is not to say that it is a low quality engine. I have well in excess of 1000 hours on my CBC
http://www.neon-john.com/Generator/CBC/CBC_home.htm
And it still doesn't use a drop of Mobil-1 oil. I used to know the life specs for both lines but I'd be afraid to quote anything from memory now.
From a maintenance perspective, the major difference is, once the GC wears out, you throw it away. Since the whole engine is probably cheaper than a rebuild kit for a GX of the same HP, no big deal.
The GC has several features of its own. Major among them are weight and noise. The engine is very light weight compared to the GX counterpart. The overhead cam with the timing belt drive is very quiet compared to the cam-in-case design of the GX that uses pushrods. Noise, or lack thereof, was a major consideration, as I originally designed this CBC for use in charging my RV's batteries. Noise in a camp ground isn't very welcome.
The GC is good enough for anything a homeowner, small farmer or even casual businessman (second job, that kind of stuff) will do. It'll probably out-last whatever it's driving.
John -- John De Armond See my website for my current email address http://www.neon-john.com http://www.johndearmond.com <-- best little blog on the net! Tellico Plains, Occupied TN WARNING: Do not use this hair dryer in the shower!
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The Gen ground post , one on the unit you wire to a ground? is to protect you incase its raining or it malfunctions and you go to shut it off, I move mine while the unit runs, if it doesnt work it is another issue, like defect.
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ransley wrote:

right, I mean the green covered "bolt" with the marking text "Grounding Post" and I've understood reading the manual that I should always use a heavy gauge copper wire (ie. 14 gauge) and connect it to my 8-ft copper spike buried in the ground (2 ft above, 6 ft buried)
the other "end" of the wire had apparently come off the 2-ft top section and I suspect could not discharge the powerhead properly while running (I am speculating as I don't know what else may have caused it to shut down while running)

sorry, don't quite understand what you write above. It was raining and the unit was not moved while it was running.
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You ran the unit in the rain! I hope it had a roof over it and did not get wet. I mean that chassis ground is to protect you, not the gen, units go bad or if its wet the operator can be killed if its not grounded when the operator touches the generator. I just have my wire attached to a piece of metal I throw on the ground, and i move it while the unit runs.
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ransley wrote:

yes, the top of the unit has a kind of lid that protects all parts in such a way that no water hits any electric parts and the powerhead is located under plastic fuel tank so also protected from rain
ok, so the grounding wire is simply to protect me and unit would continue to run even without proper ground wire, got it
not sure then why it decided to turn off this time as I had no new load starting when this occurred, both fridge and ac were running steadily, not turning off and on when it decided to flicker lights and shut off.
is there a simple way to diagnose what it will do under load to simulate the event without actually connecting to house load?
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I think you made a big mistake running it in the rain, read your manual, its not rain-weather proof. Wet air is sucked through the gen and motor to cool it and 100 humidity was in the panel. The ground rod might have already have done its job and a direct short or malfunction from rain might have actualy happened.
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Although you made some good commentary remarks, it seems that you don't know of a way to diagnose this, which is the help the OP asked for in the first place. In short, you should have just said, "no, I do not know of a way to diagnose this, but here are some observations, thoughts, etc...."
And...no, I do not know how to diagnose this problem either.
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OP said it still runs and puts out voltage, actualy he doesnt know if anything is wrong, I said he should try it, it could be simply low oil or alot of other things IF it doesnt work right but he doesnt even know, my 7500w unit says its not weatherproof, I would not want it rained upon water goes most anywhere and this is air cooled with water going anywhere it wants to. Its not weather sealed..
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ransley wrote:

perhaps my mistake in describing it but it actually is totally weatherproof, that is, there is not a drop of water possible to go anywhere on this unit, even in moderate rain. in a hurricane, yes, but yesterdays rain was a mild one where one could easily walk for short distance and get just one or two drops
so, don't think the shut down was due to weather
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a way that

plastic fuel tank

to run even

starting when

and on when

the event

I would gather up a bunch of blow dryers and electric heaters and add them up until I got a resistive load about equal to the rated output of the generator head being conscience of equaling distributing the load on both legs of the output and see if it can produce the rated output. If you have a Kill A Watt meter or something that to verify the loads that would be a plus.
Check the oil level. Even if it was recently serviced that does not necessarily mean the oil level is not low. If it is a slanted oil fill hole fill it to where it is almost running out. You can temporarily disconnect the low oil float switch to check for an intermittant problem. It is usually a yellow wire.
Visually check for any wires (probably black) or connectors that might be making contact with ground due to engine vibration.
Sometimes a bad On/Off switch can be intermittant. Most On/Off switches are open while running and connected to ground to turn off the engine. Disconnecting it temporarily (probably a black or brown wire) may help locate an intermittant switch.
Remove the fuel line and check to see if it is flowing easily (use a suitable container to catch the gas, of course). If not remove the fuel filter (if it has one) at the tank shut-off valve and clean it. Honda sometimes uses a filter screen inside the fuel line but probably not on the GX engine.
Check the air filter.
Check the governor to make sure it is moving freely.
Check and regap the spark plug.
Sometimes a bad ingition module will start and run just fine and then suddenly stop. Then it will start again.
If you do all this (what I call routine maintenance) and it stll has problems remove the float bowl from the carburator and check to see if the float is stuck. Sometimes there will be a little burr on the edges of the float pivot that can be gently sanded off. There should be a screw near the bottom of the float bowl for draining out the gas before taking if off. Turn off the fuel supply first, of course.
Are you doing anything such as connecting this generator to an inverter such as an OutBack or Xantrex SW?
Maybe the generator doesn't like your inverter AC. Does it work OK with other comparable loads? None of my microwave ovens work well with any of my generators. Neither do battery chargers.
Is this thing still under warranty?
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Ulysses wrote:

did what you suggest above.
noted my Kill a Watt has a max rated watts of 1850 (see reverse side) so it started blinking the wattage display when it hit 2950, generator ran just fine
instead of plugging individual items into the 2-15amp-120v and 2-20amp-120v outlets, I used a heavy duty cord with it's own trip breaker (it is also rated like the Kill A Watt at 1850w) and once power went over 3000 watts, this cord's breaker (not generator) tripped.
again, even at that, the generator was running just fine.
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them
both
have
a
it started

2-20amp-120v outlets, I

the Kill A

(not
Just so you realize that you have two seperate "legs" and each leg can produce 3300 watts but neither can produce (much) more than that. It is better to balance the loads on both legs.
Since you have a Kill A Watt I'd also check the output voltage and frequency under a moderate load. I tend to adjust my 5000 watt generator to about 120 volts at about 1/2 load which gives me about 63 Hz. I find many appliances run better at the slightly higher frequency mainly because the voltage is higher (I think). Of course there may be some appliances that won't like the frequency being that high and with no load it could run a bit too high so you kinda have to check it a couple of times to make sure you aren't going too far over. If your voltage is a bit low your AC might not like it.
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Ulysses wrote:

so connect two separate items to two separate 20amp outlets and try running 3000w on both?
does the fact that I managed to run off one extension cord 2950w dispel my concern that the voltage regulator may have damage or does it mean nothing since I produced it from just one outlet connection?
the max output is rated at 8000w and running is rated at 6600w

not sure how this is done, please do post some details, if possible specific to the honda gx390

if you read the original details, you will find the ac is an inverter system, converting AC to DC to AC so it does not care what's being input as it conditions the line internally to suit it's own needs - thus, it also has almost no jump in locked rotor amps but starts off with just 1.5amps and very slowly ramps it up from there over several minutes. it also uses max watts of about 700 but I have never seen it go above 350w
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I already explained to you, a Honda GX390 is a common industrial engine, not a generator. http://www.honda-engines.com/engines/gx390.htm
In other words: your off-brand generator just happens to have a pretty nice Honda GX390 engine.
Vaughn
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You now measure 120v that is no load? if so its at 3600 rpm. at the 3000w produced check voltage, even with avr its still likely 115v, your AC may be fine at 115 but it does have an input range, I set my unit above 120 to allow for load drawdown. How good yours controls voltage only you cant test it from no load to full load. Whether 3000w you use is off one leg or split from 220 call Northern. I would run it and test it, having a low oil level sensor shut you down is common.
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ransley wrote:

mark did not write anything about 120v but it was in reply to something ulysses "see the >>" wrote
the northstar (as sold by notherntool) pro series have no voltage regulator and have no low oil shutdown.
the voltage and Hz is controlled by capacitors and engine speed. idle voltage is around 125 and decreases at full load/full engine speed to just about 108-112v
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running 3000w on

concern
produced it

Well, if you can get that much power from each leg individually then you are probably in good shape.

frequency
120
appliances
specific to the

I'm not sure how it's done either. Since you have some kind of electronic voltage regulator it's different from having an alternator (generator head) that is designed to run at 60 Hz at 3600 rpm and can output higher voltage by increasing the engine speed. Increasing the engine speed also increases the frequency. Perhaps yours cannot be adjusted. I am so used to using the speed control type that I overlooked your voltage regulator. In any case you can still check the output voltage and frequency and see if it looks OK. Generally, from what I've read, most appliances will accept frequency variations within about 2% so that would be about 58.8 Hz to 61.2 Hz. However, I have found 63 Hz to be OK with most things. That is my personal experience so your gadgets may differ. If you find that your voltage is lower than, say, about 117 VAC and your frequency less than 58.8 Hz then I would have the voltage regualtor checked.

it.
system,
conditions the

in locked

from there

seen it go

Most likely the inverter will be either on or off. If the DC input is too low it probably will not come on at all. But inverters can be tricky. I have a Honda eu2000 inverter generator with a worn-out engine. It will start up and come on and output AC but it does not have full power because the engine cannot deliver the full power. If your output voltage from your generator is low then the air conditioner's inverter might not be able to draw enough power to run properly. This all seems very unlikely because of the size of your generator if you are only running the Air Conditioner. If you have all of your appliances running from one leg of your generator then you could simply be overloading it. You seem to have determined that the generator has adequate output. How is it wired to your house or whatever? Do you have each seperate leg of the generator connected to a seperate leg on the house wiring? Are you balancing your loads by having the refrigerator on one leg and the air conditioner on another?
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At that price of his unit I dought his unit has anything special in voltage regulation that will do any better than keeping it at less than 5-6v swing, my 7500 Generac with avr is that way. He still needs to manualy make a set point based on load used. 3600 rpm is still 60hz, and varies with rpm. Im sure an adjustment to rpm is easy to do.
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Most gensets have a low oil shutdown and is somewhat common to see this activate several hours after initial startup.
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Mike Copeland wrote:

the northstar 8000 PPG/ Honda 390GX had just been fully serviced 2 days prior, all new oil, new battery etc.
it's this unit http://www.northerntool.com/downloads/manuals/165914.pdf
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