DeWalt DW929K-2 Cordless Drill

Anybody familar with the Dewalt DW929K-2 cordless drill? It's a lightweight (4.5 lbs) 3/8" 18 volt cordless drill. I want to buy one but would like to hear from others who know something about it.
Thanks,
Mike
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I enlarged the partition/passage between the dini8ng room and living room. I used two drilled w/ power cords. a Cordless drill will be nice. Yep, it's a little heavy the DW928 is 14 volts and weighs 4.2 instead of 4.6 for the DW929. I wonder if I can get by w/ 14 volts?
Mike'

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A buddy told me he only needs a 1/2" chuck when drill masonry. What other uses for a 1/2"? I'm clueless.
Mike

but
years
two-three
surprisingly
after
of
drilling/driving.
duty.
much
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I use a 1/2 for lots of things, other than my job. You have a 1.2 chuck and you dont worry about the size of the bit, or the tool you may be using on the drill.... You get a 3/8ths and you will find, soon enough, you will be wishing you had the 1/2 inch.
The only 3/8th drill I have is a 90 degree DeWalt that I got for a steal at my local supply company... Of course, we wont talk about the Milwaukee 18V 1/2 that I got for $50..new...

to
I'd
consider
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Buy it ,,use it for 3hrs , Hate it , its, weight even Swarzeneger would say its a Workout . Butt go for it Plenty of Butt heads do
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this drill lasted a whole 6 months of daily use. I would not recommend it. (switch problems and charger problems.) the Craftsman 18v is still going (3 years later of daily use)
_\ \ \ | / / / _ ( ' 0 - - 0 ' ) -----ooO----(__)----Ooo----- 3GCPO
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I'll porobably return the 18 volt and get a 14 volt.
Mike '

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The 18 volt is capabl;e of 400lbs torque and the 14 volt is capable of 350 lbs torque. I don't know under which conditions the extra 50lbs of torque will be useful. Any examples when the extra 50lbs torque comes in handy?
Mike '

but
years
two-three
surprisingly
after
of
drilling/driving.
duty.
much
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Volts , Smolts , Unless U live With It , U know shit............, But U Bone Heads Dont , 9.6 vs 24 is how its how its used .......9.6 is light Haaaa Ha
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Mike asks

Driving lag bolts or large/long screws. Takes a bit of practice but if you're careful you won't sheer off many screw heads. Also the extra torque comes in handy in situations when you don't want to drill a pilot hole, e.g. sheetrocking.
My technique is to get the screw seated then "bump" 'em in with short steady bursts of power.
Oh yeah, the torque will also twist your arm off if you've got the clutch setting too high.
Go with the 1/2" chuck if at all possible, it'll handle any kind of drill bit or accessory, including hole saws and Forstner bits.
I may have overstated the case when referring to the working weight of the 18V. Lord knows I'm no Hercules but I can handle it for a couple-three hours. It's not like you're constantly holding the thing over your head. Get a hook or holster for your nail belt, use it early and often, that'll save you a bit of pain.
FWIW, over on rec.woodworking a while back some fella claimed to have made a belt battery for the Dewally. Used gel pack cells, hung it off his nail belt and connected it to the drill via a wire. 90% of the weight's in the battery. Check over in the wreck if you're interested.
Marc

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350
torque
handy?
you're
in
steady
People that repair electric motors tell me that is the best way to burn the armature.
Happy modeming, Bill
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It's a great tool and does almost anything I need. Very durable and convenient. A real powerhouse. However, I would suggest a corded power drill for masonry. Also, be aware that if holding up high - it is heavy.

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Mike asks

I've got its bigger brother, the 18V 1/2". Can't remember the model no. but it's the one with the hammerdrill setting. Works like a charm after five years of medium duty.
Mine's the older version, they came out with the XRP version about two-three years ago. Supposedly they upgraded some of the internal plastic parts to metal in the XRP models, plus 3 speed settings instead of two.
If the $$ difference between the 3/8" and the 1/2" is agreeable to you I'd suggest moving up to the 1/2"-er. The hammerdrill function works surprisingly well in light duty, and the extra chuck capacity never hurts.
If you want to save bucks and the drill will only see light duty, consider moving down a step to the 14.4V, the 18V is one heavy mother, especially after the first hour or so. From what I've heard there's little performance difference between the 14.4 and the 18 when used for the basic functions of drilling/driving. And the batteries are cheaper too.
Battery life is good, I can go about 2 hrs of near-constant drilling/driving.
I've also got the 6 1/2" Dewalt circ saw which is really handy for light duty. Cuts sheet goods like buttah, 2X lumber ditto. Runs the batteries down much quicker than the drill tho.
Marc
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Its ' lightweight' ,,, use it for a day, it will be your Hated overweight tool
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