device to push slider windows tightly closed

Page 2 of 2  


Since these are very old and inefficient windows why not consider modern replacements with proper sealing and heating/cooling benefits? With the energy tax credit and lower utility bills your clients could be money ahead.
Joe
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It sounds as if you want to rejuvenate the seals (such as they were) and provide a mechanical assist for closing the windows.
Depending on the geometry, simple slider locks might do the trick. The ones I'm thinking of are small devices that screw onto the bottom window frame, that have an "L" shaped nylon handle. When you push the handle, it pushes a wing of the L against the glass (or sash) and jams the window hard against one side of the track. Which will help better seal much of the perimeter, especially if you put a second one on the top frame.
Something like this device: http://www.allglassparts.com/product/784095899
http://www.allglassparts.com will probably have something you can use to help seal the windows better, as well as something that can give a mechanical assist to close them tight. You might even be able to use something like old fashioned vertical sliding window locks for tightening the windows.
Sashless sliders often have felt strips glued to the glass. On aluminum sliders, felt strips locked in grooves.
http://www.allglassparts.com looks very much like a "if we don't got it, it don't exist" type of place. Spend some time surfing it, I'm sure you'll find stuff that will do the job.
--
Chris Lewis,

Age and Treachery will Triumph over Youth and Skill
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 25 Apr 2007 20:04:26 -0000, snipped-for-privacy@nortelnetworks.com (Chris Lewis) wrote:

Interesting site, it is worth some additional surfing.
John Keith snipped-for-privacy@juno.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I think I found the ultimate solution today!
I was thumbing through a material handling catalog today (www.randmh.com) and saw some cargo handling bars.These are bars made to span the inside of a trailer to restrain the load from shifting.The ones in this catalog were for large trailers (89"-104" wide) but a quick internet search yielded several source of similar cargo bars made for small pickups and minivans.
John Keith snipped-for-privacy@juno.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yea, I use those to secure the load in my pickup. I'm guessing that it won't be short enough for your window, even the small ones. It is might be possible to cut the bars to a shorter length. You could try a pipe cutter. I don't see it working any better than a pipe clamp, in any case.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The ones on this link fit a 44" - 72" range (I need 48" and 52"), have a nice trigger mechanism and are priced attractively.
http://www2.northerntool.com/product-1/200304601.htm
John Keith snipped-for-privacy@juno.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Then it should work. A pipe clamp all of those features and more. It is less expensive and more versatile.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

But much heavier, bulkier, more awkward to use (offcenter thrust, trickier to get to stay in place while installing/adjusting), and not to mention an eyesore.
I have lots of pipe clamps. Yes, they can be used for this. But I wouldn't bet on it with the elderly - they'll be dropping it on their foot, or running the pipe thru the glass. Reversible bar clamps would be a trifle better (lighter/easier to manage), but still similar problems not to mention higher expense.
The classic solution is a sawn off hockey stick handle - very popular for sliding doors - just drop it in the track, and you can't open the door, period. When cut to the right length, they can help close the glass by pushing sideways on it. Or, hinge em in the middle (watch out for pinching skin or fingers).
The NorthernTool cargo bar looks great for if the windows are particularly stubborn. Notice the rubber feet. Rather better than the end of a 1/2" piece of iron pipe.
I have one of these:
http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&pD729&cat=1,43456,43391
I use it in our trailer.
Pricier, but _very_ light - <2 pounds I think. The NorthernTool one may be better for older/weaker hands. The ratchet on the LeeValley one might be hard on the fingers for some people if you have to crank on a lot of force. Its locking mechanism is _very_ solid and the feet are non-marring yet do not move.
--
Chris Lewis,

Age and Treachery will Triumph over Youth and Skill
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.