Detecting Insulation in Ceiling and Walls

I have a 200 sq ft second story vaulted ceiling room. The ceiling is the roof. I think there's R19 fiberglass insulation above the drywall ceiling. The walls are 6" with maybe R29 insulation. There are 3 large windows that make up about 2/3 the wall volume on walls facing East, South-East, and South. The windows have a low E film, and wood blinds.
I have excellent AC going to the room with the use of zoning. However, the room still requires a great deal of AC to keep it at 78 degrees during the day. Even at night when the temperature drops to the mid to high 60s, the morning temp of this room will be 77 degrees (no AC). The other upstairs rooms in the house will be around 75 degrees in the early morning. If there wasn't enough insulation in the walls and ceiling, wouldn't this room be much colder in the morning?
I think I've done everything imaginable to improve the cooling in the room. My next step might be to investigate the insulation in the walls and ceiling. Would a laser infrared thermometer be a good tool to determine hot spots caused by poor insulation in the ceiling or walls? Or is this just a waste of money? What ceiling or wall temp would be considered excessive? I've checked around the light fixture boxes and there is insulation. Maybe the whole problem is the large volume of double pane glass windows relative to the size of the room.
I'm just out of ideas as to what else can be done to improve this room. I've had several HVAC contractor look at it too, and that resulted in zoning which works great. Thanks for any suggestions.
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That is backwards should be R-19 in 2x6 walls and double R-30 in ceiling, one row inbetween the ceiling joists and the 2nd row perpendicular to the 1st.

is the floor insulated????????????????????/

check for insulation in the floor! where is the ac unit located (basement or above vaulted ceiling)? where are the duct vents located (ceiling,walls,floor)? answer these questions for more info.
_\ \ \ | / / / _ ( ' 0 - - 0 ' ) -----ooO----(__)----Ooo----- 3GCPO I'll wait here while you check
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This is a second story bedroom. HVAC comes from the basement. The floor of this bedroom is wood and is not insulated. Beneath this room is a small dining room adjacent to the kitchen. Two registers are on the floor, underneath 2 of the 3 windows. Think of 1/4 of an octangon (3 sides), and that gives you an idea of the windows along the outside walls of the room.
The vaulted ceiling was constructed with standard 2 x 6s with firring strips to allow for more insulation. The room orignally was not to have a vaulted ceiling. This is why there is no more insulation in the ceiling. There is a ridge vent running along the roof above the room.
Thanks.

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Bingo! you just said it "Two registers are on the floor,
where do you think all that cold air is going ?(on the floor) a ceiling fan to lift the cold air off the floor will help. cold air vents in the ceiling or high on the wall work better.
>Think of 1/4 of an octangon

use blinds or sun block shades to lessen the sun rays. this may help some. do you have Low-E glass in the windows?

make sure that your soffit vents are NOT covered with insulation. blocked soffit vents will build up heat in the ceiling.
_\ \ \ | / / / _ ( ' 0 - - 0 ' ) -----ooO----(__)----Ooo----- 3GCPO
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Already using a ceiling fan. Windows are low E and also have wood blinds. Can't check soffit vents for insulation because this is a vaulted ceiing with no attic. The ceiling is directly under the roof (and insulation). Also have 1 return about 8 feet off the floor. Thanks.

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