Desert Shop cooling questions

I live in DRY XXTREME SW Utah.
I have two 20' x 8' containers. Inbetween them is 16' of space. I am enclosing the ends of the space with covered gates, and putting a roof on the whole 1320 sf.
I want to put evaporative coolers in there. I see them that are stationary, and pull outside air and blow it inside. I also see roll around evaporative coolers.
Which one works better? It seems that pulling 105 degree air from the outside and cooling it would only give so much of a temperature drop. Pulling inside air, say 85 degree and cooling it might work better. BUT, the inside air would be humidified somewhat, and I don't know if the evaporative effect would be as great.
Plus, the roll arounds seem to have to be filled manually, although I could use a hose, but that would be just another trip hazard on the floor. Stationary ones would have a hard plumbed copper pipe, and would stay full automatically.
I would actually like to have the roll arounds for inside the containers so that I could move them to the container/s in use. And for the space between, a stationary one would be good.
Just wondering how the roll arounds work vs. stationary ones.
Insights?
Steve
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Steve B wrote:

In far SW KS; similar temp's and RH in the low double or single digits often as well. 106F yesterday...
Cooling drop is dependent on the volume of water you can evaporate; bigger pad area/higher air flow-->more water evaporated. That'll be the primary difference you'll see between portables and a stationary unit. Those are purely volume; the actual enthalpy of evaporation is dependent on the conditions as noted but isn't _that_ variable w/ the kinds of differences you'll see. Unless the containers are closed so you're not moving any air (and I'd think that would make them uninhabitable entirely), I doubt the actual RH increase will be sufficient to even be able to tell it.
I'd recommend to first put light-color on roofs(maybe even an awning roof to shade them???) and then some insulation; those will do more good so that the swamp coolers at least have a chance. In dry climates thay can be pretty effective. Depending on the shop usage, another alternative could be the misters used in ag barns, etc., ... they can be pretty inexpensive and plumbed into the ceiling out of way and basically ignored after. Not good idea in a precision metal shop, though, but could help a general work area if don't overdo them. We've got 'em in farrowing house and barn; they don't actually put out enough to feel damp in the higher ceiling areas but are in the hog house (on purpose).
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Oren wrote:
...

Filtering won't do anything about dissolved salts ("hard" water)...
Water here is extremely hard and swamp coolers are quite prevalent but I've never heard of anybody having difficulty w/ the pumps in them owing to that. I'm thinking there's some other cause than that.
--



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