Descending Stairs: Some Kind Of Safety Device?

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Yes, that seems to be the best long term solution. If you start to look into lifts, I (and probably others) would appreciate reading what kind of prices you run into.
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https://www.flickr.com/photos/maxmakesphotos/7665143762/?rb=1
might do double duty if you put it in your downstairs bar.
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Don't know if this would work for your case, but... if you put a railing on th eother side of the stairway, can you reach both with your hands? If so, intall it and then try walking _backwards_ down the stairway.
It looks silly but is often easier.
- try it first in a building near you that has the railings on both sides. Small office building or school, etc.
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On Sun, 1 Feb 2015 16:39:49 +0000 (UTC), danny burstein

It might work.
But I feel obliged to tell about this, which has more than one difference from what you said. My first year in college I was *running* *up* tthe stairs, only wide enough for one person, narrower than the average basement stairs, holding on to both railings, when I missed a step and must have hung from both railings a bit, and I dislocated one shoulder. I hadn't done that before. I told myself I should learn to let go of one railing.
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On 2/1/2015 11:39 AM, danny burstein wrote:

When I'm in someone else's house, I walk backwards down the cellar stairs, less likely to hit my head on things.
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In the morning when joints are stiff I go down stairs backwards, also any time I'm carrying a load or are otherwise at risk. Backwards is always safer. If you do fall you don't have as far before you hit.
Here's a thought though. Handrails are usually mounted on the side, somewhere around 42 inches high. What if you added a set overhead? That might be much more secure. At least until you get to the point where a lift is the only solution.
I've never seen it done that way but it might work.
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I thought of that, but I don't know that this technique will prevent you from falling the one or two feet you might fall to hurt yourself on the stairs. Sure, it would keep you from tumbling all the way down the stairs, but I don't think that is enough.
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On 01/31/2015 12:27 PM, (PeteCresswell) wrote:

Hope you are OK
The day after my first knee surgery (many years ago) I went flying down all the stairs because I did not know how to descend.
Fortunately I didn't make anything too much worse.
Many here had suggested a stair lift and that may be a good idea.
If your arms still have decent strength though. a railing on /both/ sides of the stairs may do the trick
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On 1/31/2015 1:27 PM, (PeteCresswell) wrote:

You need a chairlift. New ones start at about $7000. If you have to turn a corner then way more. Used ones are available if you look around, but the lift track must be modified to fit your stairs. There are left hand and right hand models depending on which side wall it needs to be located near. You really need someone who knows what they are doing, its not a DIY job.
I had to have one installed for my wife who was crippled in an auto accident. We got lucky and found a person who collects them from people who no longer need them or have passed away; and then sells and installs them for a modest profit. Used, it cost me $1580 installed.
They run off of constantly charged batteries, so still operate if the power goes out. The batteries will yield about 9 lifts if the power is out - so I am told.
The chair folds upward so people can walk by, however moving furniture or appliances by it is a non-starter unless your stairs are really really wide. Even folded the chair and track take about a foot of space next to the wall. So best take care of moving large items from one floor to the other before installation.
John
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On Saturday, January 31, 2015 at 12:27:56 PM UTC-6, (PeteCresswell) wrote:

I don't see much on my local Craigslist but there are numerous entries for "Stair Lift" on Ebay.
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