Depressions in rugs from furniture?


When I move or remove furniture, depressions in the rugs are left behind from the leg ends. They look ugly. Any way to remove them?
Thanks
Jethro
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You can try a steam iron, not too hot, and a brush to reorient rug fibres.
--
Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
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Lots of product claims & tricks for this. Neer used any. I've always just left it and make sure I hit it with the vacuum each run and eventually it goes away be it a legged chair or a heavy dresser.
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have had good luck with a strong shop vac, moving the end back and forth over the depression. some indentations, tho, just take a lot of time to resolve
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Jethro wrote:

Yes there is a product on the market for that purpose. It is called "DimpleDocter" and is made by-- Simtec Company of 28Government Road, Irwin, Pa. 15642-8887. I have one but have never used it so can't say how well it does the job. They have a website, It is <ezmoves.com> . It is a 1/8" steel rod sharpen to a point with about a 30 bend In the rod. Then the end is bent back to make a hand hold and then covered with a plastic sheath for a grip. It is not for use on glued down carpet , so the directions state. For futher info you may email me using subject title -carpet tool.
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From: http://magazines.ivillage.com/goodhousekeeping/heloise/heloise/qas/0,,284577_291774,00.html
Carpet pros suggest you fill a spray bottle with water and spritz it over the dents. Then use a blow-dryer, on the hottest setting, to blow air over any moistened areas. (The heat helps wool and nylon carpet rebound.) Fluff up fibers with your fingers.
My personal favorite is to put an ice cube in each indentation, and let cubes slowly melt. Wait 12 hours, blot up wet spots, then use the edge of a spoon to lift carpet fibers back up. Or steam away dents: Place a clean, damp cloth over them and hold an iron, on medium heat, several inches above the cloth for about 30 to 60 seconds. Don't let the iron touch the carpet -- it could burn! Brush up fibers with a coin.
From: http://www.hometips.com/home_probsolver/hps07/02_carpets/hps_carpets05.html
Heavy furniture can leave indentations in carpet. ... When areas have become crushed, use a coin to work the carpet pile back upright, then hold a steam iron not more than 4 inches above the spot (don't touch the rug!) until the iron warms the fibers.
From: http://www.mrsfixit.com/fixits/FixitDetails.asp?id41
Have you ever moved your furniture around and then had to live with ugly carpet dents? It's an easy problem to fix!
1. Grab a screwdriver and a steam iron! Use the screwdriver to loosen the matted carpet. You can also use a spoon or even a butter knife. Hold your steam iron a quarter of an inch above the dent...let the steam saturate the area. This will plump up the crushed areas and make the dent even with the rest of the carpet.
2. If you don't have the time to sit there with your steam iron, put an ice cube or two on the crushed area and walk away. As the ice melts the moisture will plump up the carpet fibers. Once the ice has completely melted, use a towel to brush the carpet fibers back to their original fullness.
From: http://www.myhomeimprovement.com/?page=prev_ques&qid )0&m1
To fix dents in carpet caused by furniture, hold a steam iron slightly above the dent. After steaming, use a fork to pull up the fibers. For irreparable dents and burns, a replacement piece is needed. Separate carpet fibers in a straight line and neatly cut the carpet backing with a box knife. With a remnant or a piece from a closet, match a new piece to the cutout. Glue the corners of the hole with carpet adhesive. Then cement the new piece in place. Use enough glue, but not so much that it oozes out.
Jethro wrote:

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As others suggest, you can steam up, but if major problem is underlay, it may not work as well as cheap underlays tend to collapse and not as readily recover. Nylon, wool or acrylic should be helped recover by steam but polypropylene or polyester, not as readily.
Frank
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