Demolishing tile floor in bathroom

We have a poorly executed tile floor in our master bath. Tiles are builder standard quality on a masonry mud base with a metal grid embedded in the mud. Unfortunately the jacuzzi in the master bath is cantilevered and the framing wasn't strong enuf when the jacuzzi was filled with water causing the tiles to crack the length of the bath. We are going to switch to a more forgiving flooring material like laminate (my parents have Mannington laminate in a bathroom for several years now and no problems with it getting wet from a shower whatsoever). My question is, what would be the recommended procedure to destroy the bathroom floor tile and mud. Thanks in advance.
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Once you get a starting place You can get a crow-bar under it and raise as much as you can . When you have pressure on the bar you might have to hit it with a single jack to crack it. Make sure you are wearing safety Glasses or a face shield, also what I did was put a old bath over it to stop the small pieces from flying. If you have access to a diamond saw ( or grinder with diamond blade) you can make cuts in it to make smaller pieces to pry up. The saw is a real dust maker , you can hold a shop vac. by the blade when cutting to control dust. I would never consider putting any kind of floor in a bathroom that has a wood core. Just my opinion.
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I was thinking of the diamond saw too. Thanks.
I would normally agree with you on the wood core floor but the Mannington click laminate has performed very well. We had it put into 2 bathrooms in my parents condo to replace vinyl. They are 80 and 90 years of age respectively and I am sure they get the bathroom floor extremely wet after a bath or shower but so far in 3 years it still looks brand new. I talked to Mannington before getting theirs installed and they told me all edges were well treated against water and held up far better than the old glue floors which depended on installer's abilities. All you have to do is put silicone caulk at the edges which is then covered by moldings and it should hold up to everything but flooding according to Mannington.
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Art wrote:

hammer, masons chisel and crow bar will do it. If your floor is like the last one I ripped up the tops of the joists will not be even, flat or level. You need even and flat, level is a bonus if you can do it. Then attach your plywood subfloor (Hey, while you are there fix the support issue!) Then your new floor. Use vinyl flooring - Go to a flooring showroom - you will be surprised at how nice some of these look these days!
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I was thinking of bolting some steel in to improve the support and to install the new flooring while the jacuzzi was filled with water but I still wouldn't trust a bathroom with a cantilevered jacuzzi with a ceramic tile floor. The cracked tile was kind of interesting. The glaze does not have a visible gap in the crack. But there is a subtle line (crack) the length of the bathroom floor.
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Art wrote:

Yea, certainly something was flexing ever so slightly. I'm not sure you would need steel, just proper framing and subfloor will do. Or, as I posted before you could just go to sheet goods. (From a guy in the middle of a major tile project)
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