Delta Saw Part


I have an old Delta 10" compound miter saw. I don't know the model number, I looked all over and did not see any sort of a model number.
Here are some pictures of the saw:
http://i173.photobucket.com/albums/w67/143house/pub/P1020961.jpg
http://i173.photobucket.com/albums/w67/143house/pub/P1020962.jpg
The plastic clear shield is broken. I used it to cut a 2" PVC pipe, and I held on to the pipe on one end, as soon as it's cut, the other end, being that it's round, rolls a little towards the blade and BAM it hits the blade and the rotating blade broke the pipe into pieces and one piece flew 10' into the other end of my garage, but the clear shield is also broken as a result as you can see from the pictures.
I then searched and found this site:
http://www.ereplacementparts.com/delta-miter-saw-parts-c-3275_3503.html
I figured I could find the part but I am not sure which model I have...it kind of look like a "Delta 36-075 Type 1 Compound Miter Saw Parts" but it could be Type 2 or Type 3? I am not sure. How would I determine my exact model.
While I am at it, what is the best way to cut a 2" or 3" PVC pipe? I could use a sawzall but a miter saw is so fast and clean, but I have trouble keeping the other end from rolling towards the wrong spot and this could be hazardous.
Thanks,
MC
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A PVC saw, of course, Available at any goodhardware store for about $20 or less. They have a wide blade and can easily make a square cut.
(Amazon.com product link shortened)
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MiamiCuse wrote:

The best way to cut PVC pipe fast and square is with an old classic miter box and hand saw.
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re: "I have an old Delta 10" compound miter saw."
How "old" can it be? It still has the labels on it! <g>
re: "How would I determine my exact model."
Call Delta or one of the parts houses. They can probably tell you about an identifying feature, like "Type 1 has a Phillips head screw here, while the Type 2 uses a Allen screw" or something like that.
re: "looks like Type 1 ... it could be Type 2 or Type 3"
All three pages show a "guard" P/N 488870-00 as a "Popular Part" on the right hand side. I'd be willing to bet it's the same guard for all 3 Types, but once again, a phone call will settle that issue.
re: "what is the best way to cut a 2" or 3" PVC pipe?"
What kind of blade are you using? I cut PVC on my Delta all the time with no kickback using a 60 tooth carbide tipped finishing blade.
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wrote:

http://i173.photobucket.com/albums/w67/143house/pub/P1020961.jpghttp://i173.photobucket.com/albums/w67/143house/pub/P1020962.jpg
No it is not that I have kick backs.
What happens is if I cut a PVC pipe (say 2" diameter), I hold it with my left hand, my right hand is on the saw handle and I lower the blade to cut the pipe. As I lower the blade to make the cut, as soon as the cut is done, I am still holding the part with my left hand, the other left over piece on the right side of the blade is free, and since it's rounded, it rolls in whatever direction it wants, if it's a long piece it just stays put. If it's a small piece it may roll to the blade as I raise the blade and it bounces off and if it hits me it might not be such a pleasant experience.
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MiamiCuse wrote: <snip>

Any reason you can't either clamp it or stick a piece of scrap lumber down the middle to keep it from flying every which way?
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re: "If it's a small piece it may roll to the blade as I raise the blade and it bounces off and if it hits me it might not be such a pleasant experience"
In the cases where you think it will be a problem (small cutoffs) release the trigger and let the balde stop before you raise it.
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Go here and you should be able to identify it. http://www.dewaltservicenet.com /
I bought an older used DP and was easily able to order the rack, handle and chuck key from tham at a good price.
They make you register but I don't seem to get spammed from them.
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The model and serial number are located on the back side of the motor housing opposite the handle. It took me a couple of minutes to find it.
Your saw looks a model or 2 newer than mine but the guard looks the same. I am inclined to agree with the poster who said "this part hasn't changed much."
Don't cut PVC with this saw.
Colbyt
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A couple of suggestions.
A less aggressive blade would probably reduce the chance of catching the loose piece with one of those big honking teeth.
It will slow you down a bit, but one of the uses for those metal plates at the back of the cutting surface is to clamp things to...
As someone else said, if you're cutting small pieces, you can always just wait for the blade to stop.
I also find the plastic guard annoying (especially since I burned it cutting steel tube with an abrasive blade and it's now opaque), but I can sure see a blade catching on something someday and shattering at 5000 rpm, so I'm leaving it on. Safety glasses won't keep my ears attached (that guard might not either, but it may slow things down). I use the thumb of my right hand to hold it out of the way while I line things up or if I'm using an abrasive blade (which I understand is much more likely to shatter, but a lot less dangerous if it does).
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