Dehumidifiers (repairable?)

Is it worth the money to have a dehumidifier repaired? I have cleaned the coils and fins, it runs and creates heat, but does not do an effective job at removing moisture, not a lot of water collects in the pan. I'm guessing it's low on charge or some kind of other problem. Am I better off just replacing a unit like that? It's just a typical home stand alone unit.
Dave
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New units rated ' Energy Star" use alot less electricty. Sears has discounts till 5-1 . Sears kenmore is rated one of the best and are alot quiter than even their 2 yr old units. I just got a new display model, 50 pt for 136.00 If its over 6 yrs old and not labeled Enrgy Star than a new unit may be best. And you can always take your unit in for an estimate, It may or may not be worth fixing.
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My DeLongi wouldn't start and I decided that it wasn't worth the trouble of fixing it. They're too cheap, and even my own labor was expensive.
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Bob in CT
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Thanks all, it sounds like replacement is best. This baby is at least 10 years plus in age and I might as well get something that doesn't make the lights dim when it kicks in.
Dave
wrote:

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wrote:

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10
the
you
connecting
Compressors today draw less than the ones from 10 years ago. I'd say "less" dimming with a new model. Of course, the circuit and what else is on it makes a difference. Ed
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It depends on what is causing the particular problem with it.

How much?
Dehumidifiers are usually rated in pints per 24 hours. Have you tried measuring what gets collected over that period to compare it to what the model is designed to recover?
How humid is the area it is in?
What is the temperature of the room's air where it is?
The evaporator (cooling) coils above the drip pan should sweat (like a cold drink on a hot day) while the compressor is running. That is how the moisture is recovered from the room air which passes over it.
If those coils are frosting rather than just sweating, not as much water will be able to be removed from the air and that moisture will only drip into the pan when the compressor shuts off long enough to allow the frost to melt.
BTW. The cover needs to be on a dehumidifier for it to operate properly.
>I'm guessing it's low on charge or some kind

I think that covers just about every possibility?
A dehimidifier which is low on refrigerant will have tell tail signs which are described at the following link:
My dehumidifier is building up frost on the coils and seems to be running continuously. What might be the problem? http://ng.appliance411.com/links/jump.cgi?IDe7

If there is a problem in a dehumidifier and it isn't just something minor (fan motor, switch, operating conditions, etc.) in many cases it is not worth while to have repaired if it is past its warranty. There is also the energy consumption considerations for older models as someone else stated.
JFYI. The 'sealed refrigeration system' (which includes the compressor) in most dehumidifiers, air conditioners, refrigerators and freezers usually has a 5 year warranty from the manufacturer.
Dan O. - Appliance411.com http://ng.Appliance411.com/?ref411=+dehumidifier
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The wash room area in my basement has a door that I keep closed. The area is not finished off like the rest of the basement. I run two dehumidifiers in the basement. One in the wash room area. Last summer, when I get lots of heat and humidity, the pan would take three to four days to gather water. It was not doing what I remember it being capable of. I switched the basement units. The other unit took about 1/2 a day to fill the pan to automatic shut off. The slow working unit was not sweating like it should, no sign of frost either.
Dave

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He should be sure the fan is running. If not, that might be worth fixing, since it's just a small motor, 2 wires, and a fan blade. If it's the compressor, he may as well get a new dehumidifier. It would cost more to fix it than to get a new one. However, there is one other thing to check. If the coils are frosted, and never get warm enough to drip, the thermostat could be faulty. That may or may not be cost effective to change. The labor is minor, but the cost of the part may be high.
If none of the above are at fault, before you toss the thing, is there enough humidity in the room to remove? If you are not sure, do a load of laundry. Do not put it in the dryer, but hang it in the room near the dehumidifier. If it fills with water after that, you may not need the thing right now, and are only wasting electricity.
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Have you actualy used a calibrated humidistat, yes they go out of calibration fast, and Taylor regurarly sells them 20% out of calibration. the last batch I saw was 18% out. Are you sure you have enough humidity to remove and at what level is it maintained. If you cant answer that then you dont now what you need. Running 2 old units 24x7 apx 50 pint units could cost you 100.00 a month at .125 kwh. My new sears does 600 sq ft of humid basement for 5 $ a month. New units are up to 50 % more efficient, Quiter, and the large Sears 70 pt. can operate at 45 f. Sears was rated best at consumer reports. New units have drain hoses so there is no tank to empty every day, a must. Your bath realy should not have a separate unit since it is the same floor. One unit will be much more efficient. The larger your unit is the less power it consumes for every pint of water removal. You have 2 units on one floor so i assume they both cycle , One properly sized unit will cycle less, meaning it will last longer and run more efficiently. For a sealed 600 sq ft basement my 65 pt sears is a bit large as it cycles alot, a 35 pt would have been fine. But depending on basement size, bath use, water and air infiltration, ventilation, a 70 pt may be right for you . Get a new unit you will save alot of electricity this summer and your payback could be only a few years on electrical savings alone.
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Most dehumidifiers freeze up below 65F and wont operate. The new sears 70 pt operates at 45. What is your temp, I still say get a new unit.
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What are the ratings for each? That could account for at least some of the discrepancy.

As long as it is sweating when the compressor is running it is likely doing as much as it can. If it isn't performing as well as it should the compressor may not be pumping as well as it should in which case repairing it is not likely worth while (if it is out of its 5 year sealed system warranty).
Dan O. - Appliance411.com http://ng.Appliance411.com/?ref411=+dehumidifier
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Hi,
Most of these can be repaired for less than the cost of a new one....no harm in dropping it off at local repair shop for an est...with an est you can better weight the pro and cons, repair or replace.

Is the room warm enough for the unit? If much below 65F the dehumidifier will not draw much.
jeff. Appliance Repair Aid http://www.applianceaid.com /
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Dave:
D > Is it worth the money to have a dehumidifier repaired? I have cleaned the D > coils and fins, it runs and creates heat, but does not do an effective job D > at removing moisture, not a lot of water collects in the pan. I'm guessing D > it's low on charge or some kind of other problem. Am I better off just D > replacing a unit like that? It's just a typical home stand alone unit.
It would probably be cheaper in the long-term to purchase a new dehumidifier: new one is probably more energy efficient. Some models have humidistats which will allow the unit to turn on and off as needed. The numbers give the amount of moisture removed in a 24-hour period; the higher the more moisture removed.
Then of course there is one additional consideration. Is the "not a lof of water collects in the pan" just due to not that much moisture in the air?
- barry.martinATthesafebbs.zeppole.com
* Earthquake: A topographical error
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Is it too cold where the dehumidifier is? In my basement, when it's too cold, the thing keeps running but the coils ice up. It has to be over 18C for the thing to work properly.
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I had the privilege of working on a couple dehum about two years ago. They had a full charge of refrigerant, but the capillary tubes were clogged. Complete total PIA to try to change those out -- one didn't want to seal where the captube goes into the evaporator.
Buy another one.
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Christopher A. Young
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