Dehumidifier sizing

I need to size a dehumidifier for a basement that's about 1,050 sq ft. The space is irregular but open, and there is a floor drain available. I don't know how to specify one, and am probably asking the wrong questions on google. Is there a chart somewhere that will help me size a unit.
This is a damp basement, and for the first time it's smelling moldy (or maybe just crappy). We rarely go down there, so is a dehumidifier even our best bet?
thanks, Keith
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k wrote:

It is really hard to say. It depends on how much moisture is coming in. That is difficult to measure.
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There must be guidelines somewhere, that's what I'm looking for. Moisture is cumulative, no? I'd like to get rid of what's there (along with the smell of it), and contain it in the future.
thanks,

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Nope. It depends of how the water is getting in, and how much of it there is. So the depth of the water table, how leaky the walls doors, and windows are, and whether there's water against the foundations, the presence or absence of open sumps, and whether the blowoff valve on your water heater is venting all affect the question more than how big the space is.
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k wrote:

Hi,
This might help... http://www.applianceaid.com/dehumidsize.html

Having one would be a good idea.
jeff. Appliance Repair Aid http://www.applianceaid.com /
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Appliance Repair Aid wrote:

That is likely about as good a chart as you are going to get. The only thing likely better might be an experienced professional from your local area to make a judgment call based on a good amount of experience with like homes in like conditions.

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Thanks for the replies, and especially the chart. Our basement is damp, not really wet. There are no windows or doors to the outside, and it's very rarely used, thus the musky smell down there. We get some white fluff on the exposed concrete wall, so I expect the dampness is from a minimal seepage thru the front wall.
Is it good to oversize? From the chart, a 25 pt unit would take care of a 'very wet' basement the size of ours. Should it be plenty for a slightly damp space of the same size, or is it a better idea to just buy a big sucker?
k
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Just remember that once you have a dehumidifier running for a while you won't need it as much.
So smaller units (25-30 pint/day) will often work fine. and after the first week you may even be able to go without it for days at a time once the humidity is reduced
Also as a general rule higher capacity means, more expensive to buy, more noise and power consumption.
AMUN
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Depends on if you can conveniently rig a way for it to drain itself, or if you have to go down into the basement and empty the damn bucket every night just before dinner.
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I have a floor drain in the right place, or believe me, I wouldn't be asking these questions. I've just learned from the net that there are dehumidifiers - low temp units - made specifically for basements. I'll pick up a 50 pt one tomorrow. Lowes has one with a hose connection, energy star and all that, two speed and 50 pt capacity. That seems to be about the minimum basement size available, and it's 200 bucks. I thought I was looking at more money, so I'm just going to buy one.
Thanks for all the good advice.
Keith
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k wrote:

Good point. I made the mistake of getting one not marked low temp and ended up getting a new one so designed for basements. As it turned out after about three recalls of the old one the finally came up with one last recall which I installed myself and now the original ones functions just fine in the basement. I use it as a backup.

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k wrote:

Well oversize will work better than undersized, but it will be more expensive to buy and a little less efficient so it will cost a little more to run. If you are on the edge, I would go larger. If you go too small you may find you need a second one. BTW the efficiency rating of the larger one MAY be better than the smaller so it may end up being cheaper. I really don't know what the likelihood of that is.
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On Fri, 30 Sep 2005 15:12:33 GMT, "Joseph Meehan"
A cupla years ago I was looking for a DH also. I believe it was the Consumer's mag that said to get the largest one you can afford.    I did that and it worked fine.
Splinter

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