Dehumidifier repair

I bought a Goldstar dehumidifier last June, which started short cycling late in the summer. It was still in warranty so I called and they sent me a check for the full price! Now I have a working unit which I assume needs a humidistat. It's the fancy electronic model with digital readout. My question is, can I replace the electronic controls with an old fashioned dial type one? I found one in a parts list for a frigidaire, but there's also a "thermostst defrost" listed. Any advice would be very much appreciated.
Rich
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Rich,
I don't think anyone can advise you without seeing the circuit diagram.
Dave M.
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On 20 Nov 2004 05:49:49 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@verizon.net (Rich Dell) wrote:

For starters, give it a thorough cleaning. Specificallym anything which reduces the airflow through the unit may be the cause of it short cycling.

Are we talking about the same unit, or are you saying you have a different one? Why do you assume it needs a humidistat?

Gary R. Lloyd CMS HVACR Troubleshooting Books/Software http://www.techmethod.com
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snipped-for-privacy@gatecom.com (Gary R. Lloyd) wrote in message (Rich Dell)

I will check today, however it has only been in service one summer.

Yes, same unit. I understand the humidistat starts it when humidity goes up, and turns it off when humidity reaches a lower level, thus my suspicion of the humidistat.

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Define "short cycling". I've heard several usages of this term, and curious which you are using.
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On 21 Nov 2004 04:39:38 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@verizon.net (Rich Dell) wrote:

On a dehumidifier, the colder the evaporator coil the more moisture is removed. For this reason, the unit is designed to run close to freezing temperatures. Any reduction in airflow through the coil drops the coil temperature. If the coil temperature drops below freezing, the defrost thermostat shuts the compressor off until the coil is defrosted.
Is there any visible frost on the coil when it shuts down?
Gary R. Lloyd CMS HVACR Troubleshooting Books/Software http://www.techmethod.com
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snipped-for-privacy@gatecom.com (Gary R. Lloyd) wrote in message

No, just water.
Thanks, Rich

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On 22 Nov 2004 05:04:39 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@verizon.net (Rich Dell) wrote:

The most likely problem is the defrost thermostat shutting down the compressor, mistakenly thinking there is frost on the coil.
This thermostat will have a sensor that is physically in contact with the coil somewhere. You can check it by physically detaching the sensor from the coil (let in hang in the air) and seeing if it still short cycles.
Gary R. Lloyd CMS HVACR Troubleshooting Books/Software http://www.techmethod.com
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The humidistat is just a switch which turns on the humidifier. Whether it is fancy digital one or a simple dial, they do the same thing. They sense humidity in the air and turn on or off at certain settings so my answer is yes, you can use any humidistat and it will do the job.
Rich Dell wrote:

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On Mon, 22 Nov 2004 17:54:51 GMT, Forza Azzurri

Humidistats are notorious for quickly losing their calibration, to the point where I have long considered them useless. I have been told that todays humidistats are much better in this regard, and that electronic humidistats are far superior to mechanical humidistats, but I have seen no authoritative studies on this.
In any case, the defrost thermostat is the more likely problem here.
Gary R. Lloyd CMS HVACR Troubleshooting Books/Software http://www.techmethod.com
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snipped-for-privacy@gatecom.com (Gary R. Lloyd) wrote in message wrote:

This makes sense, however it is now too cold to run the unit. Before you posted this, I had decided to strip everything out and ordered a humidistat made for an old Fridgidaire model. I'm going to run it without a defrost thermostat. In my research I have learned that they were an option on many units. I can always add one later if needed.
Thanks again for your help, Rich

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Thank you very much, that's pretty much the answer I was hoping for!
Rich

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