Dehumidifier question.

I've got two of those small dehumidifiers (considerably smaller than a two drawer file cabinet etc.) that you can wheel around the house on castors and plug into 117v AC.
Am using one to reduce basement humidity during this somewaht humid period.
The newer one blows the cooled/dehumidified air out through its front grill. It has not been opened or tampered with since bought new.
The older one, that someone gave me, seems to blow cooled air out the back. Therefore a remote possibily that it has been tamperd with?
But since the air fans are AC it is unlikely IMO that anything has got reversed unless a replacement fan was, say, physically installed backwards?
Which is normal? Any advice/comments would please be appreciated. Terry.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Terry, I have an older model dehumidifier also. The air enters the front grill & exits the rear over the catch can. Maybe different manufacturers blow air in different directions. Doesn't really matter which way the air flows. So long as it circulates the air & removes the moisture. Don't be so concerned about how it works, just be glad it does work.
Mike
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
MCL wrote:

Normally the humid air should enter and pass over the cold coils first, then pass over the hot coils and possibly the compressor itself second. So the air that exits should be a little warm and dry. Front to back or back to front or top to bottom etc. depends on the individual design.
Mark
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mark wrote:

xxxxxxxxxx Thank you xxxxxxxx . Thanks to Mike and Mark. And anyone else who replies.
Yes my newer unit, drawing it's air in from the back over the refrigerated coils cools and thereby dehumidifies the air, first.
And then blows air out the front, slightly warmer. Used in a 120 sq. foot below ground basement electronic workshop, for example, it not only dehumidifies but supplies warmth.
I guess the total energy it consumes (about 300 watts, I think, if running continuously) becomes availble to heat the small room.
The older, free, unit (never one to turn down a bargain!) came out of a basement apartment in a house being renovated; dampness in basements fairly common here. It doesn't seem to do as good a job operating in the same conditions.
So before taking it apart and investigating if the humidistat is operating correctly, cos its compressor seems to cut in an out too frequently, thought I'd ask here. Always willing to and often do, learn something.
Thanks guys.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Some of the energy is used in converting vapor to liquid, called the "latent heat of condensation"...you should be able to find lots of info on those terms if you are interested. The rest of the energy is is available as heat.
have fun
Mark
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It's all available as heat, including the latent heat, so they are latent heat pumps, making more heat energy than the electrical energy they consume. You can measure the COP with a measuring cup and a Kill-a-Watt meter.
Nick
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The air touches the cold coils first, and then the hot coils. So, if th back gets cold, the air comes in there.
Every dehum I've worked on blows otu the front.
--

Christopher A. Young
You can\'t shout down a troll.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.