Dehumidifier "Actual" Reads Incorrectly

I have a 4-yr old LG dehumidifier 65 pts. This year when I went to use it I noticed the "actual" reading was much too high. I know this because I have another humidimeter on the wall and I know the air was very dry. So it seems the LG is not reading correctly. Since the humidity set point looks at the actual for comparison (two side-by-side digital displays) I fear this unit is cooked. (It does seem to run all the time now.) Am I probably right, or any ideas? Thanks. Frank
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/4/2012 1:41 PM, frank1492 wrote:

Does it use batteries perchance? just a wild guess. maybe a dirty sensor?
I have a Danby that is similar to capacity to yours and it's humidity reading never matches the accurate ones. As long as it pulls water out of the air when I ask it to, that's fine with me.
You won't get things accurate, so keep that in mind.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Does it have a battery? Hmm. Do all the models like this one that restart after power failures have batteries? Never thought of that but will look into it. I will be going away for extended periods so do not want the unit to run all the time if it doesn't have to, which it might if the humidistat doesn't work right. I have noticed differences bewteen the wall unit and the dehumidifier display but this is a mile off.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Can we ASS-u-me you checked the sensor and air path to it for dust, bug nests, and buildup?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
It's in a very clean finished room. No you can't assume, but I will look into it.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Take it apart, and clean it. Very often the condensor gets clogged with dust.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
I have a 4-yr old LG dehumidifier 65 pts. This year when I went to use it I noticed the "actual" reading was much too high. I know this because I have another humidimeter on the wall and I know the air was very dry. So it seems the LG is not reading correctly. Since the humidity set point looks at the actual for comparison (two side-by-side digital displays) I fear this unit is cooked. (It does seem to run all the time now.) Am I probably right, or any ideas? Thanks. Frank
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I thought a clogged condenser would affect cooling properties but I'll take a look.
On Mon, 4 Jun 2012 18:03:15 -0400, "Stormin Mormon"

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
What was signifigant to me is "runs all the time". Clogged condensor can do that.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Frank,
Went to the LG web site and looked through the manual of the current 65 pint product. It has a 5 yr warranty. Before you give them a call. are you sure that the display is showing the "actual" RH? The manual does not mention this feature. It displays the "set point". I suspect that you need some service. It's not a "humidimeter", it's a hygrometer.
Dave M.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I knew humidimeter was wrong but couldn't think of the other one...:) There are two displays side by side- one shows actual (or what it thinks is actual), the other shows the set point. I think service is in order.
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I don't think dehumidifiers are built to last, does the coil ice up, maybe dust on coil or low on freon if it doesn't remove the moisture like before
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Everyone that I know that has experience with these says the same thing. They only last a few years. I had a Sears, made by LG. The blower fan burned out. Bought a replacement fan from Sears and it lasted one year. Bought another fan and it smoked as soon as it turned on.
Replaced that one with a GE and it lasted two years. I did buy the extended warranty on that one, something I almost never do. But knowing what crap these are I did. So, just got a brand new Amana to replace the GE.
To the OP's question, like someone said, is he sure it even reads the current humidity? Some only display the setpoint. And some display the temp in one display, the setpoint and/or current humidity in the other.
He says it's running, but is it removing any water? The Sears/LG I had, the blower failed, but with the compressor running it sounded normal. Is good air flow coming out?
Finally, there is the mystery of my new Amana. When set to 55 it maintains about 52 as indicated by both it's own display and other units. But when I set it to 60, it then maintains 63. Which makes no sense at all. All in all, these things sure aren't what they used to be.....
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I shut the unit down for about an hour to replace the drain hose connection. When I restarted, all was fine! I guess there was some icing. Never encountered that before in all the years I have been using this dh (since 2008) but the cellar was quite cold when it was first turned on (which it always is.) Also I have a transparent drain hose and the dh seemed to be functioning just fine through all this despite the icing. Also a mystery as to why the icing would have caused "actual' humidity to read incorrectly high. More penance I suppose...should have noticed the icing right away! (Thanks all for your help!) Frank
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
...unless the ice acted as a moisture source. With no melting tho I'd wonder. Does stable ice (not melting) create moist air around it? Anybody out there good at this?
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The H20 is going from the air to the ice, so I'd think it reduced the humidity reading.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
...unless the ice acted as a moisture source. With no melting tho I'd wonder. Does stable ice (not melting) create moist air around it? Anybody out there good at this?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It's possibe something is kaput in the de-icing system. I'd keep an eye on it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Some dehum have a "freeze stat" that turns off the compressor when the coils start to freeze.
A good refrigeration guy can add freon. Or a freeze stat, or both.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
Time for a new dehumdifier. Icing usually indicates low freon (or its not a low temp dehumdifier) and its usually a sealed unit. At least mine was, and it lasted about as long as yours before I had to buy a new one. The new one works great, the old one ices up when running side by side.
They dont make 'em like they used to.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.