Deglossing Walls for Painting

I set out to paint my kitchen which had high-gloss, Navajo White paint; the lousy "contractor's special". I tried Jasco's TSP, first with a rag, then with a ScotchBrite pad. It was mixed according to the instructions on the label. In both cases, the TSP was a miserable failure, even though it claims to be a deglosser. Even worse, using a ScotchBrite pad has a sanding effect. Unless you want smooth walls or are planning to retexture, I wouldn't use a ScotchBrite pad.
Another other option is to use a primer like Kilz or Zinsser. However, those are somewhat pricey, IMHO.
Then I thought, "Geez, I may as well just retexture the stupid walls and ceiling, since I have a hopper and all." This is certainly an option.
However, then, I came up with Plan D. Go buy some cheap wallboard compound. Mix it extremely thin, i.e. paint consistency. Then, just paint it on as you would any other paint. Et Voila, the walls are the same as if they had just been textured. Of course, you need to let the soupy mud mixture dry completely before painting.
Also, there is a possibility that the mud might flake off because of the shiny paint underneath. However, I didn't have this problem and I used this method for my kitchen, bathrooms, etc., wherever the highgloss paint had been.
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You will styill need to prime the new mud coat before painting. A cheap PVA primer would do the trick even without the mud. Why would you want to use a premium primer if you weren't trying to cover up something difficult or outdoors.
Have you tried painting right over the glossy. It might work just fine.
220 grit sandpaper would have been a better choice than scotchbrite.

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I didn't need to primer the thin mud coat I laid on. It was fine.
Yeah, I tried that first. The new coat of paint beaded-up, i.e. it didn't adhere very well at all.
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Get a can of de-glosser? They make a solvent mix that does the job, available in the paint dept. Also does de-greasing.
Been a long time since I've used it, so I don't know of a name, but it is a thin, solvent, that you use a rag to wipe on/off the stuff your going to paint.
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Acetone will soften the surface of most paints
wrote:

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seven_percent wrote:

I don't quite understand your shiny paint. Did you use real TSP or the fake kind (actually a silicate). As a paint store explained to me the TSP is harder to rinse off but works better, contrastwise, many people prefer the silicate because it does rinse off easier.
I have always used the real TSP. Put some (I don't measure it) in about 2 gallons and wash the wall with a wash cloth. I rinse lightly with fresh water. Just because the paint still looks somewhat shiny after TSP doesn't mean that it hasn't been deglossed. I have never had any flaking when painting.
You are right, never use scotchbrite or you are likely to end up with a mess.
Glad you found a solution to your problem.
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Am I the only one here LOL at this:

Pricey, as compared to what? Screwing around with TSP and a scoth pads all day? For a job like this, the cost of a gallon of Kilz, shouldn't even be a factor.
BTW, I'm not sure Kilz is appropriate for this or suggesting that he use it, just that it's crazy to worry about the cost.
.
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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net says...

Hear hear.
For the labor one puts into this, and the fact that one will be looking at it for years, it's well worthwhile to get the best materials. In this case, primer and paint. Knock off that little devil or whatever that's on your shoulder while you're in the paint store or borg telling you that you're foolish not to grab the cheapest thing on the shelf.
And go to a paint store instead of a borg so you can ask knowledgable people some questions about prep and priming.
Banty
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Yeah, you are.
You didn't read my whole post, dummy. The cheaper alternative wasn't TSP and a scotch brite pad. It was using a thinned mixture of mud. I suggest a remedial reading (and typing) class.
A gallon of Kilz??? You don't have the slightest idea about the area I am dealing with. . . Try four rooms with cathedral ceilings all covered in high gloss paint. It would be more like 10-12 gallons of Kilz vs. one five gallon container of mud, thinned to paint consistency. You do the math, if you are capable.
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