Deep well sockets better than standard depth?

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If a person was gonna buy a small socket set for home use.... would it be wise to get only deep well sockets instead of standard depth as deep well might be more useful?
Advice?
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snipped-for-privacy@privacy.net wrote:

Many inexpensive sets will have both...but personally, w/ just one, I'd take the standard for the convenience of smaller size. Would depend a little on what I expected to use it for, perhaps.
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I have both, so I can speak from experience. I use the deep well sockets about 5% of the time. There are many situations where deep well sockets won't clear obstructions or otherwise are just cumbersome to use. Also, since the depth of the deep well socket puts the handle further away from the nut, there is a tendency for the socket to come off the nut when using the very end of the socket. If I had to pick one style, I'd get 12-point standard depth sockets.
Regards, John.
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<< If I had to pick one style, I'd get 12-point standard depth sockets. >>
Better choice is standard depth 6 point sockets. Most home owners will be involved in a struggle with reluctant nuts and bolts, and the 12 point sockets tend to round off cheap consumer fasteners very quickly. HTH
Joe
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I agree with the other responders. Look at the swivel sockets. Snap on has a ball and joint configuration on them. I find that they are very useful in a lot of places. My set happen to be for an impact wrench.
Check harbor freight for sets that are inexpensive. I use a lot of harbor freight tools, if they break no biggie.
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wrote:

It's a biggie if the socket splits while you are applying pressure and you break a few fingers as a result.
BB
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BinaryBillTheSailor@Sea++.com wrote:

You would not break a finger (or more likely smack it) if you were using the wrench correctly. The points may strip with cheap stuff, but how often does a socket split? I've never had a socket split and I go up to 150foot-pounds or so every once in a while when taking stuck wheel nuts off. Course I'm only a little guy and don't use more than an 18" bar (well sometime I use a 18" piece of pipe on the bar to extend it past 24")
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You will almost NEVER see a real technician with a busted or banged up anything... with just a little thought and common sense, you can almost always position yourself to safely deal surprise slippages and/or tool failures. Having and using the correct tools for the job plays a big part too.
BTW, yours truly busted a brand new 1/2" drive 32mm socket Tuesday... went at maybe 125 foot pounds using a 24" breaker bar, and surprised hell out of me. Doesn't happen often, but once in a while...
Erik
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this'll reduce the chances of injuring your hand if something slips. ...thehick
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On Thu, 13 Jan 2005 05:40:55 -0500, frank-in-toronto

Yeah, you might save your hand, but when it lets loose, you may beak your nose or lose a few teeth instead. I saw exactly that happen to a member of Bob Sharp's pit crew from pretty close up. Yow!
BB
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On Thu, 13 Jan 2005 11:58:39 GMT, BinaryBillTheSailor@Sea++.com wrote:

laughing. ...thehick
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I was always taught You minimize or eliminate risks of knuckle busters and cut hands and other body parts by always pulling on a wrench/ratchet, plus you're a better judge of tite - go pushing on ratchets and people are not only going to chastise you, they're going to laugh at you. You're going to not only tend to round the bolt head and bust those nuts, bolts & threads yore going to damage your body too.

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I used to have a Karmann Ghia. It had lug bolts, not lug nuts. Good fit so even if you tightened them just snug, they held in place. I used to put a piece of pipe over the handle and jump on it to get the bolt to move. One you loosened it 1/4 turn, it came out by hand. Broke a lot of sockets but Craftsman replaced them every time.
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You will likewise never see a real technician using cheap tools, because they understand that they are not as safe. Meanwhile, accidents DO happen to everybody and anybody. Cheap tools, especially wrenches and sockets = safety issue.
BB
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On 1/12/2005 2:53 PM US(ET), snipped-for-privacy@privacy.net took fingers to keys, and typed the following:

ones are better, otherwise you'll be using a wrench on the nut to break it loose, and then a nut driver to finish screwing it off. I have a set of both, and in both metric and SAE. Sometimes I wish I had more deep sockets (and pockets).
--
Bill

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Buy the standard set. Later, buy the one or two deep sockets you may need. There will be times that a deep socket does not allow you to get into a spot, probably more often that you need a deep one. I have maybe two or three deep sockets and that is all I ever used in my life. If you are heavily into mechanical repairs you'd probably already have both sets.
Buy a decent set and it will last you for your lifetime. Cheap tools are no bargain if they break or strip or cause your bolt to strip. Mine are about 40 years old and in that time I've only replace a couple that broke, more from abuse than wear.
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On Wed, 12 Jan 2005 13:53:11 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@privacy.net wrote:

good quality set. first. then later buy another set that will probably contain both. no man can have too many socket sets. i made up a tool kit for the garage which is just chock full of everything, a smaller kit for carrying in the car and an even more select kit for fixing bicycles away from my house. you can't really have too many tools. keep an eye out for sales. most socket sets are half price at one tiome or another. ...thehick
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On 1/12/05 1:53 PM, in article snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com,

There is another alternative I haven't seen mentioned yet. It's box end ratcheting wrenches. The ones I've seen are like the non ratcheting versions with one size at one end and another size on the opposite end. Mac, Snap On and Sears have them. Sizes are a bit limited and the wrench needs a little more space to work.
Dean
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On 1/12/2005 8:38 PM US(ET), Dean Hoffman took fingers to keys, and typed the following:

the bolt head. I have a number of them and they're probably the last wrench I would use in most work.
--
Bill

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The answer is yes, no, definitely, and maybe.
Sometimes the bolt is long, and you need a deep well to get over the bolt and down to the nut.
Sometimes the clearance is so that you can't get anything but a shallow socket on it.
Sometimes you can use a socket on it, but you can't put the socket all the way on the handle because then it would be too tall.
Sometimes, when you loosen the nut, you can't get the socket and handle out of the recess where you have putten it in to get to the thingus.
So, the answer is yes, no, definitely and maybe.
At various times, nothing but a deep well socket, shallow well socket, box end, open end, or ratchet wrench will work.
IOW - one size does not fit all, and there is no such thing as buying one set that will do it all. If I were to HAVE to buy one set FIRST, I would pick a deep well set. You will need more than that, so go buy those cheap sets at ACE or HD, and then you can afford two sets for less than one good set will cost. It will last plenty long unless you get into engine rebuilding.
When buying wrenches, look for the sets of about ten wrenches sold at ACE, and yes, get a set of metric, too. And a set of metric sockets, too. And a set of deep well metric sockets. And some metric screwdrivers. And an adjustable metric wrench.
Just to cover all possibilities.
If you find that you absolutely need one socket or one wrench to do one job, might as well get the set because rule is, you will need another size within ten days. And nowadays buying only one will cost you as much as a set. They make more money that way.
Last rule: you can't have too many tools.
HTH
Steve
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