Decorative painting

I plan to use the sponge-on technique, with one or two coats over the latex base coat. Almost everything I've read talks about using glazes over the base coat, with glaze meaning a transparent "paint" that I would tint to which ever color I choose, using separately bought coloring agents.
Rather than going to this trouble and expense, why can't I simply have a paint dealer tint a latex paint of the same sheen to the color I want, selected from one of those ubiquitous color cards that all paint stores display?
Thanks,
Ray
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On 4/28/2008 1:22 PM Ray K spake thus:

Or why can't you even just mix it yourself? I've done a little faux-type painting this way, just experimenting with mixing my own colors. For a glaze, start with white and mix in colors. Think it for a glaze-y look. Try it out on a test surface, and just play with it until you get some good results. No need to use the "official" glazes.
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Ray K wrote:

techniques require the base color to show and take on only a trasparent effect of the glaze color. For sponging, unless you want a very suble effect, paint would be the best choice. A glaze with a heavy mix of paint sponged on might give you more of the second color than if you take straight paint and sponge it on very lightly. The whole idea of a glaze is to be able to give a transparent tint - if you thinned paint with water for the transparent effect, it wouldn't have enough binder to stick, thus the glaze. Your way sounds fine.
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wrote:

This is a good question for the ladies at the beauty shop...)
My limited understanding is that without using a glaze, one color paint can absorb another color. By glazing you maintain the base color. As mentioned the transparency / translucence effect.
If colors bleed together; it may not be what you desired.
Housewives I've seen that faux paint, always include the glazing process.
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I've used paint over paint. Works well.
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Ray K wrote:

This is the only site of the dozen or so I've visited that actually recommended latex second and third coats rather than glazes for sponging on. http://www.artsparx.com/sponging.html
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wrote:

Sponging with colors; is not the same as faux panting with glaze. You will do fine.
With a sponge and a dab of paint you can make the job look any way you want. Hard to mess it up :)
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Thats what pros do, but a final coat might be different, its all paint, cheap water base stuff, tint is free, or go where it is,
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