Deco On A Slope / Retaining Wall

I am getting ready to start working on the right side of my property in time for summer, and although I am pretty handy, this job will be somewhat of a challenge and I am in need of some advice.
The Problem...
I have a decent sized yard, but the 32 foot in-ground swimming pool takes up most of it. I have a good sized chunk of my yard that is currently not used for anything other than drainage for the pool filter (extention pvc I added for backwashing) and for a gutter extention I added (aluminum tube). I uploaded a bunch of pictures so you could see what I am up against. http://www.drumrx.com/Yard/Yard.htm
What I am looking to do...
I would really like to take advantage of this space and build an extention to my existing deck. The entire property is sloped in the rear. The existing retaining wall that holds up the dirt and decking at the pool rear ends and takes a roughly 45 degree turn.
How to go about this...
Should I simply build a triangular shaped free standing deck with some REALLY DEEP footings and somehow tie it in to the existing deck? If so, do the footings need to go 4 feet (NJ code I think) below the lowest existing retaining wall at the bottom of the slope, or do they need to go 4 feet below my neighbors property level for a total of about 5 1/2 feet?
Or, This may sound silly... Can I continue and extend the retaining wall from where it ends and have it wrap around the entire property line at a 90 degree angle going up toward where the kids play house is? My thinking is that I could also tie in some crossmembers of railroad ties by extending the psuedo planter boxes and connecting them to the new retaining wall for strength. Can you even build a deck by running joists off of a retaining wall??? Do I then need to backfill, add add footings to the backfill?
Either way I go about this, I am also planning on continuing the PVC fence all the way around. With the freestanding deck, how do I go about attaching the fence to it?
Any advice as to the best, safest, and (of course) least expensive way to go about this would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks,
Frank
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On Jan 9, 7:11 pm, snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net wrote:

Might get real complicated in a hurry. IMO you'd save the most by having a tight set of plans to take to the building inspection office. Best source would be a competent architect or engineer, whatever. Such professionals could help you avoid code infractions and anticipate unforeseen problems. If you intend to do the work yourself, the time saved by good planning will give you a good pay off in $$ and project completion. HTH
Joe
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Thanks Joe.
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