Deck screws in PTW wood

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I know my late mom's deck was a cheapo effort. Still, got PTW for the decking boards. Now, all the screws are rusty and pulling out and the wood is going bad, no doubt due to no kinda deck stain/preservatives and covering the deck with household carpenting, which held the moisture even longer than the Rocky Mountain snows. Plus, a buddy told me PTW will rot regular deck screws (3-1/2" ).
I plan to eventually renew the deck boards w/ new PTW boards, but what kinda screws? I don't wanna hafta do this again. ;)
nb
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On Thursday, September 17, 2015 at 11:23:40 AM UTC-4, notbob wrote:

think no magnetc stainless for screws and better to use composite decking with no exposed screws for longer life
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wrote:

they are ceramic coated. Or you can use hot galvanized if you can find them - otherwise non-magnetic stainless.
Or use cedar or composite decking. Even good spruce will last as long as some of the crappy PT being sold today if you through a coat of penetrating stain or Thompsons on it.
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Nothing but stainless for me but Florida is tougher on hardware than most places.
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I like ringed deck nails. They don't leave a hole to hold water and are less noticeable once stained. I don't know of any reason that one needs screws.
I've been seeing screws even in railings. SS, square drive screws. They look fancy but split the wood and offer no advantage over nails.
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Holy crick-crock! So many variables. Do you mean ring shanked nails?
I haven't done any carpentry since 16 box nails were the height of construction technology. Were talking framing hammers. ;)
When I built new steps for my late mom, I used screws. Not cuz I knew best, but noticed the original steps and pretty much the entire deck was done with 3-1/2 screws (now all rusty and pulling out).
The first thing I learned was, I didn't know the diff between a battery pwrd drill and an impact/drill. After discovering I hadda pre-drill all those screw holes (3 guesses which one I got) cuz my DeWalt btry drill would only push those screws about half way, I discovered the impact/drill. I now have a Hitachi drill/driver, but I also have my late brothers framing air gun and a lot of his other tools (he was a master carpenter).
Reading online, I see arguments for both screws and nails. I'll be re-doing the deck board/planks in wood, in the CO Rockies, so a lotta dry/freeze cycles. Hope this info helps ppl replying to my OP.
nb
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| Holy crick-crock! So many variables. Do you mean ring shanked nails? |
None other. :)
| cuz my | DeWalt btry drill would only push those screws about half way
That's another "improvement" that I don't get. I use a normal drill as a scrwgun. It works fine. There are times when a cordless drill would be nice, to avoid the extension cords, but I really just don't find extension cords to be such a big hassle. And maintaining one good drill is a lot cheaper than maintaining high-powered portable drills and the batteries needed to keep them running all day.
| Reading online, I see arguments for both screws and nails. I'll be | re-doing the deck board/planks in wood, in the CO Rockies, so a lotta | dry/freeze cycles. Hope this info helps ppl replying to my OP. |
I would look at the reasons people give. See if they really have sound logic or whether they're just repeating something they heard. I'm in New England. Lots of weather extremes. I just don't see the rusting of galvanized nails that people talk about. Our deck here is almost 20 years old. PT 4/4 x 6. It's not the most elegant wood, but it's held up fine. I've also used solid oil deck stain (which is hard to get now). I think one of the big mistakes people make with PT is to think it's impervious and then not put a finish on it. That's not only ugly. It also results in a lot of splitting, due to the combination of damage done by the pressure treating itself and the drying from the sun.
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| At 20 years old, it is probably the old PT wood, not the current stuff. Required | fasteners are different. |
It is the old stuff. So I have resistant arsenic instead of whatever it is they're using now. (To this day I haven't been able to find out what the new "acq" is made of.)
But that doesn't have anything to do with nails and screws.
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On 09/17/2015 3:28 PM, Mayayana wrote: ...

Alkaline Copper Quaternary (also known as ACQ) treatment is made up of copper, a bactericide and fungicide and a quaternary ammonium compound (quat) which acts as biocide.
It is, ime, mostly ineffective as compared to CCA which is, generally, less effective than creosote (at least for posts in ground in this area).

Not sure what the above means, but--
ACQ, CA, ACZA and CCA all require hot-dipped(*) galvanized nails or stainless steel nails and screws. Fasteners should meet the ASTM A-153 specification for hot-dipped galvanizing. 304 or 316 stainless steel is good, some other common SS, "not so much". But note, don _not_ use galvanized fasteners with SS connectors.
Aluminum should not in direct contact with these products.
(*) Electroplated/electro-galvanized and mechanically galvanized coatings are _not_ equivalent to hot-dip galvanized. It requires Class 55 or higher mechanical galvanizing to be equivalent (per ASTM B695).
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| Alkaline Copper Quaternary
Thanks. I've been trying to find that for years!
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Still, it's info one must wade through or perhaps miss a key point.
CCA = Chromated Copper Arsenate ACQ = Alkaline Copper Quaternary
Both ar Pressure Treated Wood (PTW), the later replacing the former by EPA dictate.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alkaline_copper_quaternary
I'm still getting conflicting opinions on which are the best fasteners. A retired gen contractor jes voiced his opinion that ring shank nails are to be avoided. (sigh) 8|
nb
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| CCA = Chromated Copper Arsenate | ACQ = Alkaline Copper Quaternary | | Both ar Pressure Treated Wood (PTW), the later replacing the former by | EPA dictate. | Yes. And it's not rated for ground contact! So there isn't really anything for that now.
| I'm still getting conflicting opinions on which are the best | fasteners. A retired gen contractor jes voiced his opinion that ring | shank nails are to be avoided. (sigh) 8|
Does he say why? I get the sense that a lot of people are just wowed by the latest thing. It's hard to imagine any reason not to use ringed, galvanized nails, except for Maggie's point that screws can be easily taken out for disassembly.
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That was my buddy's argument. Screws allow dis-assembly. I hope to never have to disassemble this deck before I take a much needed dirt nap. ;)
nb
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I just dismantled our back stairs I built about 6-7 years ago. I had a few screws that snapped, but stripped heads were the more common problem. The vast majority unscrewed just fine. Certainly easier and far less damage than trying to pull nails (I try to repurpose old lumber whenever possible).
For cedar and redwood I always use stainless steel screws. These prevent the ugly black stains around the screws. Unfortunately, stainless is fairly soft so it's easy to strip the heads, even when installing them. The newest ones I used had torx heads and I didn't strip a single screw this time around.
I prefer screws for decks. They don't work their way out the way nails can. I've seen several decks that were nailed where the heads were sticking up 1/8 to 1/4 inch. Dangerous for bare feet.
Anthony Watson www.mountainsoftware.com www.watsondiy.com
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My deck is about 12-13 yrs old. PTW, but never any sealer applied. It was installed with 3-1/2 gold (anodized?) phillips head deck screws. The wood is now dried out and splitting, lotta screws stick up about 1/4" and are so rusty, they either break off when trying to unscrew or I can pull them out with a pair of pliers, the threads having completely rusted off. I doubt the screws have twisted out, it's more a case of the wood shrinking (I'm guessing).
nb
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On Thu, 17 Sep 2015 18:17:42 -0400, "Mayayana"

You can still get CCA wood from a marine contractors supply but the lumber is only going to be .6 or .8 CCA The poles are still 2.5 tho.
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On 9/17/2015 10:53 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Oddly enough, the lst few weeks I've been noticing a couple boards coming loose, on my deck. I'd got some 1 5/8 inch deck screws, they seemed to help. But not really long enough to anchor well. The boards are an inch or so, and that's not much thread into the beams. Later I find that I've got a box of 3 inch deck screws. My plan is later today to pilot hole through the deck boards, and put in a couple three inchers, between the shorter screws.
That should help hold the Pressure Treated Wood wood.
If not might need to visit an ATM machine, on the way to get my auotomobile VIN number.
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Christopher A. Young
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"Bob F" < snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:mtf9il$fkk$ snipped-for-privacy@dont-email.me...
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wrote:

the halmark of the hot dipped fastener. Sometimes they are bonded together by the zink when you buy them - -
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On Thu, 17 Sep 2015 18:14:50 -0400, "Mayayana"

I am doing a test on this as we speak It has been going on for close to 2 years and I haven't seen anything unusual yet. This is sitting on the south side of my screen cage, out in the yard.
http://gfretwell.com/ftp/PT%20lumber%20test%2010-25-13.jpg
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