Deck appearance

I've decided to use 5/4x6 rather than 2x6 boards for the surface of our deck because the house is a one-storey and I thought the thinner surface boards would be a subtle improvement on the thicker boards. Has anybody got any opinions on how these thinner boards look in general? Do they tend to look flimsier or neater?
Also, the green tinted treated lumber that's available at HD for decks and stuff:: Is it possible to stain this to a richer brown color or am I stuck with the greenish tint? If so, what wood should I be getting for eventually having a brown deck?
Thanks.
Paul
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My next door neighbor used them for decking about 10 or 12 years ago and they are holding up well. His railing conceals the fact that they arn't 2 by.

I believe that if you wait 6 months after installing the deck before staining, enough of the green tent will be gone that it won't matter.
Tom J
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stuck
eventually
thats the chemical they use to pressure treat the wood, it will go away in a few months and look light brown.
p.s ever hear of stain?
punch
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Yes, I've heard of it (and even used it before), but I wasn't sure about applying it to the treated lumber. I had heard something that when working with treated lumber you should wear gloves because of the chemicals in it. This made me wonder.

in a

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The 5/4 has chamfered edges which will make it less likely to splinter, especially if you're using pressure treated pine. In my opinion, they look better than the 2x6's. There's a good article in the Aug '03 Consumers Reports about their ongoing tests of deck finishes.

deck
look
stuck
eventually
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The PT lumber will be pine -- probably southern yellow pine. It's the only type of wood that is available as pressure treated -- especially from the bix box stores.
But note that there will be color variations. These can be due to a board being on the outside of a pallet-load during shipment; or from the inclusion of heartwood versus sapwood; and for other reasons.
Those color variations will fade over time. In 6 or 8 months, all of the boards are likely to look the same. If you want, you can use a translucent stain to even out the colors sooner.
I know that some recommend waiting till you stain. But note that most pro's stain a deck the same day that they build it. Those guys usually guarantee their work, so they wouldn't do it if it was a problem.
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The folks at Cabots (http://www.cabotstain.com ) recommend waiting, but no longer than 3 months.
Seasoning a new deck [Decking Questions] FAQ#105
"Q: If I build a deck in the fall, should I allow the wood to season until the following spring or summer? A: No. Test dry wood with a few drops of water. If the water soaks in immediately, the wood is ready to absorb stain. If a mill glaze is present, the water drops may not absorb readily and you may have to wait for a short period of seasoning before staining. Mill glaze is thought to be a thin, resinous coating on the surface of smooth-planed lumber produced in the mill at the time the boards are planed. It is believed to be associated more with cedars and redwood, although improperly kiln-dried, smooth-planed pine may also have a resinous buildup. Cabot recommends pressure-treated wood be stained as soon as the wood is dry, usually 2-3 weeks if the wood was not kiln-dried and is purchased in a wet condition. Wet wood will shrink. For the best results, wet wood should be dried before the construction of a deck or dock. Wet wood should not be stained or painted. The moisture content of the wood should be 15% or less as measured with an electronic moisture meter before painting or staining."
Also, from Cabot Technical Bulletin No. 3, Deck Problems, Autumn 1992:
"The homeowner should not allow wood to remain exposed for longer than 3 months. Recent research by the Forest Products Laboratory has shown that over-exposing unprotected wood for long periods of time can cause surface damage that reduces the wood's ability to hold on to applied stain or paint coatings - leading to premature coating failure. Some weathering of the wood is necessary if non-film forming finishes, such as stains and water repellents, are to penetrate the wood's surface and thus work effectively. Whether old or new wood, the surface should be inspected for cleanliness; it must be free of mildew, dirt and other foreign matter. If the deck is dirty, it should be scrubbed with Cabot Problem-Solver Wood Cleaner #8002, rinsed with clean water and allowed to dry for 3-5 days prior to staining."
Victor
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